Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know there are many questions out there already concerning encoding/decoding. But this is driving me nuts and I'm in desperate need of some help.

I read in a file converting the lines to unicode

line = unicode(line,'latin-1')

Then, I do some mutations and try to write the contents back to a file, encoding the string like this

o_str = '%s,%s' % (new_sname, loc )
w_out.write(o_str.encode('latin-1'))

The file contains for instance the city name 'Genève' which is u'Gen\xc3\xa8ve' as unicode. Encoding it as 'Latin-1'

gue = gu.encode('iso-8859-1')

gives me on the console

>>> print gue
Genève

But in file my file it still is 'Genève'. Can somebody point me to what I am missing?

share|improve this question
    
The editor which you use, might use a different encoding to display the string. –  thefourtheye Aug 15 '13 at 11:07
    
You mean the text editor? No, I check that already. –  LarsVegas Aug 15 '13 at 11:09
    
u'Gen\xc3\xa8ve' is not correct unicode. That is UTF-8 data instead, decoded from latin-1. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 15 '13 at 11:09
    
What is w_out? –  Burhan Khalid Aug 15 '13 at 11:11
    
@thefourtheye Regardless of which encoding the editor uses, the letter è should still only look like a single letter if it was correctly encoded with latin-1. Which leads me to the conclusion that the Python script encodes with a wide-character encoding like UTF-8. –  kqr Aug 15 '13 at 11:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are decoding UTF-8 data as Latin 1, use the correct codec instead:

>>> 'Gen\xc3\xa8ve'.decode('latin1')
u'Gen\xc3\xa8ve'
>>> print 'Gen\xc3\xa8ve'.decode('latin1')
Genève
>>> 'Gen\xc3\xa8ve'.decode('utf8')
u'Gen\xe8ve'
>>> print 'Gen\xc3\xa8ve'.decode('utf8')
Genève

The correct Unicode codepoint for the è letter is U+00E8, represented by \u00e8 or \xe8 in a Python Unicode literal, and the hex bytes C3A8 in UTF-8. Misintepreting C3 A8 leads to two unicode characters à and ¨, which you then write back to your file as C3 and A8 again because Latin1 maps one-on-one with Unicode.

share|improve this answer
    
I get it. But I bet when I will look at it tomorrow I'll be confused again;-) –  LarsVegas Aug 15 '13 at 11:20
    
OT: the Careers 2.0 link in your profile is a 404 for me because it leads to the edit view of your profile. Use your public URL instead. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Aug 15 '13 at 11:25
    
Thanks for letting me know. –  LarsVegas Aug 15 '13 at 11:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.