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so say I have a list of lists

x = [['#', '#', '#', '#', '#'], ['#', '0', ' ', ' ', '#'], ['#', '#', '#', ' ', '#']]

Say I need to split this into 3 rows of strings, how do i do this?

Here is how I can do it BUT it is not scalable, say i had tons more lists, then I would have to write so many print statments. I thought about a for statment

print "".join(mlist[0])
print "".join(mlist[1])
print "".join(mlist[2])

I was thinking about something like this but it didn't work

zert = ""
total = 0
for a in mlist:
     for b in a:
        if total < 6:
            print zert
            total = 0
            zert = ''
        zert += b

        total += 1

^ the problem above is that i would need to save a first, then iterate over it BUT just checking if there is not an inbuilt function? I tried ''.join(mlist) but that does work since its lists in a list?

Is there a simpler way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
You want each inner list on a line, rather than specifically 3? –  doctorlove Aug 15 '13 at 11:25
    
yes i do @doctorlove as a string –  Ghozt Aug 15 '13 at 11:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use a list comprehension to join lists:

print '\n'.join([''.join(inner) for inner in mlist])

The list comprehension creates a string of each nested list, then we join that new list of rows into a larger string with newlines.

Demo:

>>> mlist = [['#', '#', '#', '#', '#'], ['#', '0', ' ', ' ', '#'], ['#', '#', '#', ' ', '#']]
>>> print '\n'.join([''.join(inner) for inner in mlist])
#####
#0  #
### #

You could also have used a for loop:

for inner in mlist:
    print ''.join(inner)
share|improve this answer
    
ahhh I see, '\n'.join <-- thats what i was looking for! Thank you –  Ghozt Aug 15 '13 at 11:30
    
I think you can use a generator expression here, can't you? '\n'.join(''.join(inner) for inner in mlist) –  Benjamin Hodgson Aug 15 '13 at 11:51
    
@poorsod: Yes, but that is slower than using a list comprehension. See list comprehension without [ ], Python –  Martijn Pieters Aug 15 '13 at 11:52
    
@MartijnPieters Thanks for the link! Is join the only case where the list comp is faster than the generator exp? –  Benjamin Hodgson Aug 15 '13 at 11:55
1  
@poorsod: str.join() is a specific case where using a list comp is better, because str.join() has to use a list internally (it iterates over the strings twice, once to calculate the output length, and a second time to build the string). –  Martijn Pieters Aug 15 '13 at 11:57
>>> orig_list = [['#', '#', '#', '#', '#'], ['#', '0', ' ', ' ', '#'], ['#', '#', '#', ' ', '#']]
>>> new_list = [ "".join(x) for x in orig_list ]
>>> new_list
['#####', '#0  #', '### #']
>>> print("\n".join(new_list))
#####
#0  #
### #
share|improve this answer

Working with what you have so far, to just directly print it.

for a in mlist:
  print "".join(a)  
share|improve this answer

or most simply

for a in x:
    print "".join(a)
share|improve this answer

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