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I try to parse XML file via xml.sax.handler.ContentHandler subclass. The parser fails at the following line:

<desc>&#18;some_text&#15;</desc>

and I get the following error:

xml.sax._exceptions.SAXParseException: test.xml:687338:17: reference to invalid character number

The spec(http://www.w3.org/TR/xml/#sec-references) says that the characters &#18; and &#15; are valid. So is there a bug in a parser or I'm doing something wrong?

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Characters are valid, but the error says, that they point to invalid character number. Looking at ascii table, html chars start from 32. –  Rapolas K. Aug 15 '13 at 11:57
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To clarify myself a bit, lets take an example of a word "hdwasrwi", it is made of a valid characters, but does it make it a valid English word? - no. So this is what the error is telling you, and in specs I didn't find anything mentioning that "&#18;" is a valid combination, only that it is made up of valid characters. –  Rapolas K. Aug 15 '13 at 12:21
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Although you can encode these characters, they're still at best "frowned upon". See http://www.w3.org/TR/xml/#NT-Char for a list of "bad" characters. Then, see this 1.1 spec as well, which adds some back as allowed in some cases, as "restricted" characters.

If the text legitimately should be able to include these characters, it's wise to encode it first, e.g., with base64 encoding. The receiver thus gets well-formed XML (for XML 1.1, it's not always required but that will make it compatible with 1.0).

I had to deal with externally-supplied invalid XML myself once before, where I had no control over the sender. It's pretty messy. In my case I could rely on certain patterns, and hence use regular expressions to "patch away" improprieties, but this is a hack: a workaround done out of desperation, instead of a proper fix.

(In my case I had to handle things that would have tripped up even an XML 1.1 parser—the sender was just plain broken, a bunch of perl code using faulty regexp's and some literal <foo> type strings to generate pretend-XML—so I never looked any further.)

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Ok, I'll send bugreport to my sender and cut off these characters. –  Pehat Aug 15 '13 at 12:43
    
The answer misses the point that #15 and #18 are invalid in XML 1.0 –  Michael Kay Aug 15 '13 at 13:00
    
@MichaelKay: Noted, found a bit more on XML 1.1; answer edited. –  torek Aug 15 '13 at 17:45
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The characters at Unicode codepoints 15 and 18 are allowed in XML 1.1 but not in XML 1.0.

It looks like your parser doesn't support XML 1.1 (many don't).

You either need to get an XML 1.1 parser (and ensure that it says version="1.1" in the XML declaration), or you need to fix the process that is producing ill-formed XML.

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