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I've just learn something about makefile and here is my first question for it.I have main.cpp hello.cpp factorial.cpp and functions.h files

all: hello

hello: main.o factorial.o hello.o
    g++ main.o factorial.o hello.o -o hello

main.o: main.cpp
    g++ -c main.cpp

factorial.o: factorial.cpp
    g++ -c factorial.cpp

hello.o: hello.cpp
    g++ -c hello.cpp

clean:
    rm -rf *o hello

In the code above, why files have an extention .o ? shouldnt be .cpp or what is the differences between using .cpp and .o

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Building a C++ program is a two-stage process. First, you compile each .cpp file into a .o object file. Compiling converts the source code into machine code but doesn't resolve function calls from other source files (since they haven't been compiled yet).

main.o: main.cpp
    g++ -c main.cpp

factorial.o: factorial.cpp
    g++ -c factorial.cpp

hello.o: hello.cpp
    g++ -c hello.cpp

Second, you link the object files together to create an executable. Linking resolves the external references in each object file.

hello: main.o factorial.o hello.o
    g++ main.o factorial.o hello.o -o hello

By the way, there is a typo in the clean target. *o should be *.o.

clean:
    rm -rf *.o hello
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thank you for your explanation! –  caesar Aug 15 '13 at 12:42
    
one more question. How It avoids unnecesarry compiling? I mean makefile is used to decrease compile time .Isnt it? now here,hello says that go to main.o factorial.o and hello.o and all of them compiles main.cpp factorial.cpp and hello.cpp respectively.Finally all these 3 object files are compiled again.So all files are compiled even if we use makefile ? –  caesar Aug 15 '13 at 12:50
1  
@Eday Make won't rebuild targets if it doesn't have to. If factorial.o exists, and factorial.cpp hasn't changed, it won't rebuild factorial.o. Similarly if hello was already built and none of the .o files has changed it won't rebuild hello. –  John Kugelman Aug 15 '13 at 13:30
    
I'm so greathful for your helps.Thanks again! The last thing I want to ask is that I saw 2 lines in a makefile and these are $(EXECUTABLE): $(OBJECTS) $(CC) $(LDFLAGS) $(OBJECTS) -o $@ and .cpp.o: $(CC) $(CFLAGS) $< -o $@ what kind of these are ? is it bash ? and how should I learn purpose of these lines ? –  caesar Aug 15 '13 at 13:35

.o denote "object-files", these are files compiled from source but not yet linked into an executable or a library.
In your make-file, i.e.

main.o : main.cpp

says that main.o will be created from main.cpp using g++ -c main.cpp.

Eventually, all files with .o will create the executable hello as stated in

hello: main.o factorial.o hello.o
     g++ main.o factorial.o hello.o -o hello
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what differs if I only changes .o with .cpp ?? –  caesar Aug 15 '13 at 12:37
    
.o-files are binaries, opening them with a text-editor you would get rather random symbols, there is nothing left of your initial source-code. –  bash.d Aug 15 '13 at 12:39
    
@bash.h thanks for valuable comments ! –  caesar Aug 15 '13 at 12:41
2  
@Eday the advantage of first compiling each .cpp file into an object file (.o) is that if you make changes to one of your .cpp files, you only need to re-compile the according .o file and re-link all .o files into an executable. If you would do something like g++ -o hello *.cpp, you always would have to re-compile all files, even if most of them are unchanged. –  Thomas Kühn Aug 15 '13 at 12:44
    
@ThomasKühn thanks for info.One more question what is the purpose of the part after colon ? Does the right side of colon specify whether the target is compiled or not ? –  caesar Aug 15 '13 at 13:01

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