Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following program will fail because Contracts is not instantiated.

Of course I can instantiate it in my constructor but if I have dozens of properties and/or multiple constructors I have to keep track of which are instantiated, etc.

And of course I could create large blocks for these properties with full gets and sets and private field variables, etc. But this gets messy as well.

Isn't there a way to automatically instantiate these collections with the nice C# property syntax?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestProperty232
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Customer customer = new Customer();
            customer.FirstName = "Jim";
            customer.LastName = "Smith";

            Contract contract = new Contract();
            contract.Title = "First Contract";

            customer.Contracts.Add(contract);

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Customer
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public List<Contract> Contracts { get; set; }

        public Customer()
        {
            //Contracts = new List<Contract>();
        }
    }

    public class Contract
    {
        public string Title { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is no such syntactic sugar, but I'd like to point out a few things:

  • Collection properties should be read-only in any case.
  • If you have a lot of such properties in a single type, it's a strong symptom that you are violating the Single Responsibility Principle
  • If you have multiple constructors, you should always take great care that there's only one constructor that does the real work, and all other constructors delegate to that constructor. Alternatively you can delegate all constructor work to a private Initialize method.
share|improve this answer
    
Which version of C# are you using? –  Joe Dec 1 '09 at 11:00
    
Why the downvote? –  Mark Seemann Dec 1 '09 at 14:47
    
Re collection properties - except for the annoying niggle of XmlSerializer, but agree in theory. –  Marc Gravell Dec 1 '09 at 15:10
    
In the current version of C#, if I understand the question, this answer is wrong. There is syntactic sugar (as per my answer). –  Joe Dec 1 '09 at 16:31
1  
@BillW: It sounds like you just described Lazy Initialization. There are certainly scenarios where this would be appropriate, but listing them all is not possible in this comments field. It's never my default approach though - I'd rather check the invariants as soon as possible... However, your question sounds like a good candidate for a 'proper' Stack Overflow question :) –  Mark Seemann Dec 2 '09 at 14:32

No, there is no sugar. Instantiate them in your parameterless constructor and redirect all your other constructors there, so that it will always execute.

class MyClass
{
    //Many properties

    public MyClass()
    {
        //Initialize here
    }

    public MyClass(string str) : this()
    {
        //do other stuff here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Long answer: how's this?

using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace proto
{
    public class Customer
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }

        public string LastName { get; set; }

    }

    public class Contract
    {
        public List<Customer> Customers { get; set; }

        public string Title { get; set; }
    }

    public class ContractDemo
    {
        public Contract CreateDemoContract()
        {
            Contract newContract = new Contract
            {
                Title = "Contract Title", 
                Customers = new List<Customer>
                {
                    new Customer
                    {
                        FirstName = "First Name",
                        LastName = "Last Name"
                    },
                    new Customer
                    {
                        FirstName = "Other",
                        LastName = "Customer"
                    }
                }
            };

            return newContract;
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Sugary or lemony : you decide : (VS 2010 beta 2, FrameWork 4)

    Customer customer = new Customer
    {
        FirstName = "Jim", 
        LastName = "Smith", 
        Contracts = new List<Contract> { new Contract { Title ="First Contract" } }
    };

Works fine with your existing class definitions, but feels awkward to read ?

best,

share|improve this answer

The short answer is no.

share|improve this answer
15  
the long answer is Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo –  Pondidum Dec 1 '09 at 10:35
    
Long answer is loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong ;) –  Maximilian Mayerl Dec 1 '09 at 10:38
    
@pondidum I think you mean this: nooooooooooooooo.com –  Jason Jan 7 '11 at 3:30

Not sure what you are actually looking for, but you could tidy it up a bit like this...

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestProperty232
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Customer customer = new Customer() { 
                FirstName = "Jim",
                LastName = "Smith"
            };

            Contract contract = new Contract() { 
                Title = "First Contract"
            };

            customer.Contracts = new List<Contract>() { contract };

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Customer
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public List<Contract> Contracts { get; set; }

        public Customer()
        {
            //Contracts = new List<Contract>();
        }
    }

    public class Contract
    {
        public string Title { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You could make Contracts not be an autoproperty:

private List<Contract> _contracts;
public List<Contract> Contracts
{
    get
    {
        if (_contracts == null)
        {
            _contracts = new List<Contract>();
        }
        return _contracts;
    }
    set
    {
        if (!_contracts.Equals(value))
        {
            _contracts = value;
        }
    }
}

That will allow you not to have to explicitly instantiate Contracts.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can have some syntactic sugar to make this shorter: get { return _contracts ?? (_contracts = new List<Contract>()); } –  Joel Mueller Dec 1 '09 at 18:07
    
@Joel Thanks ! I was just trying this technique (using the null coalescing operator) fifteen minutes ago, and going nuts as to why I was getting an error message that said : "The left-hand side of an assignment must be a variable, property or indexer" : I was failing to enclose the initialization of the private backing-field (on the right side of the ?? operator) _contracts in parentheses :) –  BillW Dec 2 '09 at 16:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.