Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

What I would like to have is something like this:

var fnc = new constructor(); // --> function()...
fnc(); // --> Running main function
fnc.method(); // --> Running method

So that one could create new fnc instances, while having the methods in the constructors prototype. However, I don't seem to be able to have result of the constructor as a function, as regardless of the return clause, it seems to become a object, resulting to ..

Uncaught TypeError: Property 'fnc' of object [object Object] is not a function 

:(

Edit: Added example code. So what I'm thinking is along these lines.

var constructor = function() { return function() { console.log('Running main function.') }; };
constructor.prototype.method = function() { console.log('Running method.'); }

var fnc = new constructor();

console.log('constructor: ', constructor);
console.log('fnc:         ', fnc);
console.log('fnc.method:  ', typeof $.method);
console.log('');
fnc();
fnc.method();

In this case, one gets the...

Uncaught TypeError: Object function () { console.log('Running main function.') } has no method 'method' 

...error as the function provided by the constructor is different than the constructor itself, on which prototype chain is tacked on. Just can't seem to wrap my head around this. Did one version with jQuery like initialization, which did the trick alright but I later on found out that it ended up doing it through the empty function prototype, meaning every function got the methods.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by zzzzBov, Bergi, RAS, Michael Härtl, Sergio Aug 16 '13 at 6:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Can you show the implementation code you have so far? The three lines only show how you want it to behave, not how you've made it behave so far. – apsillers Aug 15 '13 at 13:02
    
Show us your code that is throwing this error. fnc is not a property in what you presented us. – Bergi Aug 15 '13 at 13:10

You can create methods specifically to objects like this

function myObject(name)
{
   this.name = name;
}

myObject.prototype =
{
   getName: function()
   {
      console.log("Name is: " + this.name);
      return this.name;
   }
}

var newObj = myObject("javascript");
var objname = newObj.getName();
console.log("Name is again: " + objname);
share|improve this answer
1  
This does not address the question. – zzzzBov Aug 15 '13 at 13:41
function Constructor(n,s,r) {
this.var1 = n;
this.var2 = s;
this.var3 = r;
}

var fnc = new Constructor("Hi", 3, 6);

fnc.prototype.myMethod = function() {
console.log (this.var1);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't answer the question. – zzzzBov Aug 15 '13 at 13:40

You can not create callable objects from constructor function instances.

You could have a function that returns a callable function that has methods assigned to it:

function foo() {
    function fn() {
        ..do stuff..
    }
    fn.method = function () {
        ..do more stuff..
    };
    return fn;
}
var bar = foo();
bar(); //does stuff
bar.method(); //does more stuff

You could even call the function as a constructor, but it would actually be doing the same thing as calling the function directly as a function, and not be constructing a new instance of the class:

var baz = new foo();
baz(); //does stuff
baz.method(); //does more stuff
baz instanceof foo; //false
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's one way of doing but it doesn't use prototyping, meaning every new fnc would create their own functions instead of using the ones up the prototype chain. When you have lot of methods, lot of fnc's and a low end device, it's not ideal. :/ – crappish Aug 16 '13 at 7:06

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.