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  • Is there anyway to prototype or extend the native Function object in JavaScript to run another function on function calls ?
Function.prototype.called = function() {
  var start = new Date().getTime();
  var returnValue = this();
  this.end = new Date().getTime() - start;
  this.calls += 1;
  return returnValue;
};

Of course this code doesn't work but the goal here would be to benchmark function call execution times.

I know that I could do this outside the function itself and by not extending the native Function object (which is generally a bad idea) but this is really only an experiment rather than a serious solution.

I want to benchmark multiple functions so this would be a less tedious solution.

It is also the reason why I don't prototype the call and apply properties (which would mean that I would have to rewrite every function call test() into test.call()).

Thank you in advance !

share|improve this question
    
Why doesn't this code work as expected? –  Bergi Aug 15 '13 at 13:22
    
It's not that this code doesn't work it's just that I would want this code to execute when any function is run the usual way : test(), not by calling my own customised version like this : test.called(). –  m_vdbeek Aug 15 '13 at 13:23
    
Something I could integrate into a pre-existing code base to benchmark function call times. –  m_vdbeek Aug 15 '13 at 13:24
2  
If you want to profile all functions instead of just a few selected ones, you're better off using your browser's developer tools instead of some script. –  Bergi Aug 15 '13 at 18:23
1  
@Bergi, I quoted you comment in my answer as it's very relevant. Hope you don't mind. –  plalx Aug 15 '13 at 18:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is not possible to efficiently intercept all method calls in JavaScript. You can always override Function.prototype.call and Function.prototype.apply, but these aren't called when calling a function normally, e.g. someFunction();.

However, if you are targetting methods from specific objects, you could always do a deep-traversal of these objects and wrap every function into an interceptor function. However, be advised that you would have to rerun that interception process for every method added after the process ran.

I created an example for you:

/**
 * AOP utility function developed for learning purposes.
 *
 * @param {Object} o The object to traverse for overriding functions.
 * @param {RegExp} rx A regular expression for matching members.
 * @param {String} pointcut 'before' or 'after'.
 * @param {Function} advice The function to run when the pointcut is met. This function will be passed an {Options} object as last argument.
 * @param {maxDepth} maxDepth The maximum depth for deep-traversal. Defaults to 0.
 *
 * Options object
 *     overrideReturn {Boolean} - True to override the return value of the original function with the return value of the advice. Defaults to false. Pointcuts: before, after
 *     cancel {Boolean} - True to avoid calling the original function. Default to false. Pointcuts: before
 *     overrideArgs {Boolean} - True to override the arguments that will be passed to the original function with the result of the advice. Defaults to false. Pointcuts: before
 *     result {*} - The return value of the original function. Pointcuts: after
 */

function inject(o, rx, pointcut, advice, maxDepth) {
    var pointcuts = {
        before: function (fn1, fn2) {
            return function () {

                var options = injectNewOptions(arguments, BeforeOptions),
                    fn2Result = fn2.apply(this, arguments),
                    fn1Result;

                if (options.cancel) {
                    return fn2Result;
                }

                fn1Result = fn1.apply(this, (options.overrideArgs ? fn2Result : arguments));

                return options.overrideReturn ? fn2Result : fn1Result;
            };
        },
        after: function (fn1, fn2) {
            return function () {
                var fn1Result = fn1.apply(this, arguments),
                    options = injectNewOptions(arguments, Options),
                    fn2Result;

                options.result = fn1Result;

                fn2Result = fn2.apply(this, arguments);

                return options.overrideReturn ? fn2Result : fn1Result;
            };
        }
    },
        Options = {
            overrideReturn: false
        },
        BeforeOptions = Object.create(Options, {
            cancel: {
                enumerable: true,
                writable: true,
                value: false
            },
            overrideArgs: {
                enumerable: true,
                writable: true,
                value: false
            }
        });

    function injectNewOptions(args, baseOptions) {
        var options = Object.create(baseOptions);

        Array.prototype.push.call(args, options);

        return options;
    }

    inject = function (o, rx, pointcut, advice, maxDepth, depth) {
        var k, f;

        maxDepth = maxDepth || 0;
        depth = 0 || depth;

        for (k in o) {
            if (typeof (f = o[k]) === 'function' && rx.test(k)) {
                o[k] = pointcuts[pointcut](f, advice, pointcut);
            } else if (typeof f === 'object' && maxDepth <= depth) {
                inject(f, rx, pointcut, advice, maxDepth, ++depth);
            }
        }
    };

    inject.apply(this, arguments);
}

Now we can use inject like:

var o = {
    sum: function (a, b) {
        return a + b;
    },
    product: function (a, b) {
        return a * b;
    }
};

inject(o, /^sum$/, 'before', function () {
    var options = arguments[arguments.length - 1]; //get options object

    //override the arguments passed to the intercepted method
    options.overrideArgs = true; 

    return [2, 2];
});


inject(o, /^product$/, 'after', function () {
    var options = arguments[arguments.length - 1]; //get options object

    //override the arguments passed to the intercepted method
    options.overrideReturn = true; 

    return options.result + 3;
});

o.sum(1, 2); //4 because we have overriden the args with [2, 2]
o.product(2, 2); //7 because we added 3 to the result and overrided the return value

EDIT:

It's worth mentionning here what @Bergi said in the comments.

If you want to profile all functions instead of just a few selected ones, you're better off using your browser's developer tools instead of some script.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the answer ! =) This should be a chapter of Beautiful Code ! –  m_vdbeek Aug 15 '13 at 19:35
    
@m_vdbeek Haha =P I'm glad that I could help! –  plalx Aug 15 '13 at 20:40

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