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Can someone please explain what's going on here. Why can't the compiler see hello() with no arguments in class A?

struct A {
    virtual void hello() {}
    virtual void hello(int arg) {}
};
struct B : A {
    virtual void hello(int arg) {}
};

int main()
{
    B* b = new B();
    b->hello();
    return 0;
}

g++ main.cpp

main.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
main.cpp:13:11: error: no matching function for call to ‘B::hello()’
main.cpp:13:11: note: candidate is:
main.cpp:7:15: note: virtual void B::hello(int)
main.cpp:7:15: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided
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marked as duplicate by PlasmaHH, chris, mathematician1975, Casey, RAS Aug 15 '13 at 15:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
needed argument, read what compiler is giving u –  UnknownError1337 Aug 15 '13 at 13:22
1  
Because in inheritance only name is considered, not full prototype. –  Aneri Aug 15 '13 at 13:23
1  
The base class one doesn't get considered when there's one already in the derived class unless you add a using statement to pull it in. –  chris Aug 15 '13 at 13:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because your overriding of hello(int arg) hides other functions with the same name.

What you can do is to explicitly introduce those base class functions to subclass:

struct B : A {
    using A::hello; // Make other overloaded version of hello() to show up in subclass.
    virtual void hello(int arg) {}
};
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Declaring a function called hello in the derived class hides all functions with the same name in the base class. You can unhide them with a using declaration:

struct B : A {
    using A::hello;
    virtual void hello(int arg) {}
};

or access them via a base-class pointer or reference:

static_cast<A*>(b)->hello();
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The hello(int) member function in B takes an int argument and hides the hello() member of A. If you want the hello member function of B not to hide the one in A, add using A::hello to B.

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