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Is there a way in C to store the whole command line options and arguments in a single string. I mean if my command line is ./a.out -n 67 89 78 -i 9 then a string str should be able to print the whole command line. Now, what I am able to do is to print values in different vector forms.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <getopt.h>
#include <string.h>


int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
 int opt;

for(i=0;i<argc;i++){
printf("whole argv was %s\n", argv[i]);
}

while((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "n:i")) != -1) {
switch (opt){
    case 'n':
             printf("i was %s\n", optarg);
             break;

    case 'i':
             printf("i was %s\n", optarg);
             break;
      }
   }
  return 0;
 }

I want this, as optarg only is printing my first argument and I want all the arguments to be printed, so I want to parse it after storing it in string.

share|improve this question
    
Not in general, no, since it's hard to reverse-engineed whatever the shell (which is usually what invokes your program) got from the user. For instance ./a.out foo vs ./a.out "foo"; your program can't know if the user quoted an argument. –  unwind Aug 15 '13 at 15:07
2  
Since you're on Linux, you can read /proc/self/cmdline –  Steve Lazaridis Aug 15 '13 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Simply write a function like this:

char * combineargv(int argc, char * * argv)
{
    int totalsize = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < argc; i++)
    {
       totalsize += strlen(argv[i]);
    }
    // Provides space for ' ' after each argument and a '\0' terminator.
    char *ret = malloc(totalsize + argc + 1);
    if (NULL == ret)
    {
        // Memory allocation error.
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < argc; i++)
    {
        strcat(ret, argv[i]);
        strcat(ret, " ");
    }
    return ret;
}

This will simply combine all of them, placing spaces between args

Update: I have modified the original to eliminate the buffer overflow issue.

share|improve this answer
    
why totalsize + 15? –  Ingo Leonhardt Aug 15 '13 at 15:10
    
I gave it a small buffer zone, since we are adding spaces. –  phyrrus9 Aug 15 '13 at 15:11
    
add one in the loop! –  Ingo Leonhardt Aug 15 '13 at 15:11
1  
because you are still using the [], malloc() is a function. I am editing the original answer to reflect the malloc –  phyrrus9 Aug 15 '13 at 15:25
2  
WARNING: This has a HUGE potential bug. You call strcat passing the buffer you just got back from malloc. A buffer which may contain GARBAGE. Since strcat will look for the first '\0' (which may not be there in your buffer) your function could end up overwriting random memory. Please either memset the entire allocated buffer so it's full of null bytes or manually set ret[0] = 0; before you loop, copying arguments. @user227666 please be very careful if you do use this function. –  Nik Bougalis Aug 15 '13 at 16:49

What you can do is to loop over argv and build a string with strcat

char* CommandLine = 0;
unsigned int CommandLineLength = 0;
unsigned int i = 0;

for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
    CommandLineLength += strlen(argv[i]) + 3; // Add one extra space and 2 quotes
}

CommandLine = (char*) malloc(CommandLineLength + 1);
*CommandLine = '\0';

// Todo: Check if allocation was successfull...

for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
    int HasSpace = strchr(argv[i], ' ') != NULL;
    if (HasSpace) {
        strcat(CommandLine, "\"");
    }
    strcat(CommandLine, argv[i]);
    if (HasSpace) {
        strcat(CommandLine, "\"");
    }
    strcat(CommandLine, " ");
}
// Do something with CommandLine ...
free(CommandLine);
share|improve this answer
    
you should add at least one blank between two arguments –  Ingo Leonhardt Aug 15 '13 at 15:00
    
Of course, one space charcter should be included. If one command line argument itself contains spaces, the command line should be quoted with "". –  bkausbk Aug 15 '13 at 15:01
    
don't want to annoy you, but now CommandLineLength += strlen(argv[i]); should be changed to ... + 3; --- one for the blank and two for the quotation (or you check twice) :-) –  Ingo Leonhardt Aug 15 '13 at 15:06
    
@bkausbk your code gave me the following errors: In function ‘main’: fun27.c:21:15: error: ‘new’ undeclared (first use in this function) fun27.c:21:15: note: each undeclared identifier is reported only once for each function it appears in fun27.c:21:19: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘char’ fun27.c:25:5: warning: passing argument 2 of ‘strchr’ makes integer from pointer without a cast /usr/include/string.h:235:14: note: expected ‘int’ but argument is of type ‘char *’ –  user227666 Aug 15 '13 at 15:08
    
Use strncat instead of strcat. strcat is usually poisoned by source control rules or makefiles, because it has potential to introduce buffer overflow vulnerabilities. strncat takes a size argument, allowing you to ensure that the buffer doesn't overflow. –  Craig Aug 15 '13 at 15:12

It depends on the platform.

In Windows, you can use GetCommandLine().

share|improve this answer
    
I am using Linux –  user227666 Aug 15 '13 at 15:16

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