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I have a small problem with while loop in Python 2.7.

I have Defined a procedure, print_multiplication_table, that takes as input a positive whole number, and prints out a multiplication, table showing all the whole number multiplications up to and including the input number.

Here is my print_multiplication_table function:

def print_multiplication_table(n):
    count =  1
    count2 = 1
    result = count * count2
    print 'New number: ' + str(n) 
    while count != n and count2 != n:
        result = count * count2
        print str(count) + " * " + str(count2) + " = " + str(result)
        if count2 == n:
            count += 1
            count2 = 1
        else:
            count2 += 1

Here is an expecting output:

>>>print_multiplication_table(2)
new number: 2
1 * 1 = 1
1 * 2 = 2
2 * 1 = 2
2 * 2 = 4

>>>print_multiplication_table(3)
new number: 3
1 * 1 = 1
1 * 2 = 2
1 * 3 = 3
2 * 1 = 2
2 * 2 = 4
2 * 3 = 6
3 * 1 = 3
3 * 2 = 6
3 * 3 = 9

Everything works just fine until I add my while loop:

while count != n and count2 != n:

And now my output looks like this:

>>>print_multiplication_table(2)
New number: 2
1 * 1 = 1
>>>print_multiplication_table(3)
New number: 3
1 * 1 = 1
1 * 2 = 2

What have I made wrong and how can I fix that?

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change your while loop to:

while count <= n and count2 <= n:
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it works BUT it's doesn't printing-out "2 * 2 = 4" and "3 * 3 = 9" –  Michael Vayvala Aug 15 '13 at 15:08
    
@MichaelVayvala. Ok, Let me see. –  Rohit Jain Aug 15 '13 at 15:08
    
@MichaelVayvala. Check edit. –  Rohit Jain Aug 15 '13 at 15:09
    
thanks, now it works –  Michael Vayvala Aug 15 '13 at 15:10
    
@MichaelVayvala. You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Aug 15 '13 at 15:10
import itertools
def print_multiplication_table(n):
    nums = range(1,n+1)
    operands = itertools.product(nums,nums)
    for a,b in operands:
        print '%s * %s = %s' % (a,b,a*b)

print_multiplication_table(3)

Gives:

1 * 1 = 1
1 * 2 = 2
1 * 3 = 3
2 * 1 = 2
2 * 2 = 4
2 * 3 = 6
3 * 1 = 3
3 * 2 = 6
3 * 3 = 9

range generates the individual operands; product generates the cartesian product, and the % is the operator which substitutes values into the string.

The n+1 is an artifact of how range works. Do help(range) to see an explanation.

In general in python, it is preferable to use the rich set of features for constructing sequences to create the right sequence, and then use a single, relatively simple loop to work with the data so generated. Even if the loop body needs complex processing, it will be simpler if you take care to generate the right sequence first.

I'd also add that while is the wrong thing where there is a definite sequence to iterate over.


I'd like to show that this is a better approach, by generalising the above code. You will struggle to do that with your code:

import itertools
import operator
def print_multiplication_table(n,dimensions=2):
    operands = itertools.product(*((range(1,n+1),)*dimensions))
    template = ' * '.join(('%s',)*dimensions)+' = %s'
    for nums in operands:
        print template % (nums + (reduce(operator.mul,nums),))

(ideone here: http://ideone.com/cYUSrL)

Your code would need to introduce one variable per dimension, which would mean a list or dict to keep track of those values (because you can't dynamically create variables), and an inner loop to act per list item.

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Try

def mult_table(n):
    for outer_loop_idx in range(1,n+1):
        for inner_loop_idx in range(1,n+1):
            print("%s + %s = %s" % (outer_loop_idx,inner_loop_idx,outer_loop_idx*inner_loop_idx)

You don't see while used a lot for places where iteration works. This code looks great in the editor window.....

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