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I'm trying to create an abstract class with an abstract method, which should be able to return any type of a list with items extending a SuperBean.

Later I then want to create a generic class which can add items to that lists. Example:

class AbstractService<T extends SuperBean> {
    //this is what I'm aiming for
    void add(T item) {
        // "is not applicable for the arguments (T)"
        superBean.getSublist().add(item);
    }
}

abstract class SuperBean {
    abstract List<? extends SuperBean> getSublist();
}

class MyBean1 extends SuperBean {
    List<MyBean2> sublist;

    List<MyBean2> getSublist() {
        return sublist;
    }
}

class MyBean2 extends SuperBean {
    List<MyBean3> sublist;

    List<MyBean3> getSublist() {
            return sublist;
        }
}

Question: how to I have to define the abstract getSublist() class so that I can add any T item that is an implementation of SuperBean?

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1  
What is the problem defining the field as List<MyBean>? Looks like you want to obtain MyBean2 mb2 = aSuperBean.getItem(); and MyBean3 mb3 = aSuperBean.getItem();, which will be wrong. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 15 '13 at 16:30
    
No I need the specific class types like MyBean2 for the sublists. –  membersound Aug 15 '13 at 16:32
    
I'm not sure if this is what you are aiming for, but you could try something like this: public abstract class GenericList<T> extends ArrayList<T> –  Josh M Aug 15 '13 at 16:32
    
What is the declaration of superBean in your AbstractService.add method? –  Jason C Aug 15 '13 at 16:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will need to add to your generics in AbstractService:

//        Add S to be T's type parameter         Add <S> to SuperBean here
class AbstractService<S extends SuperBean, T extends SuperBean<S>> {
    // I'm assuming superBean is defined here.
    T superBean;

    //this is what I'm aiming for
    void add(S item) {
        superBean.getSublist().add(item);
    }
}

Next, you will need to make SuperBean generic, with its subclasses defining the generic type parameter <T>:

abstract class SuperBean<T extends SuperBean> {
    // Now you can define the abstract method properly:
    abstract List<T> getSublist();
}

Each subclass defines its generic type parameter appropriately:

class MyBean1 extends SuperBean<MyBean2> {
    List<MyBean2> sublist;

    List<MyBean2> getSublist() {
        return sublist;
    }
}

And MyBean2 is defined similarly:

class MyBean2 extends SuperBean<MyBean3> {
    List<MyBean3> sublist;

    List<MyBean3> getSublist() {
            return sublist;
    }
}

This allows you to declare services as follows:

AbstractService<MyBean2, MyBean1> service1 = new AbstractService<MyBean2, MyBean1>();
AbstractService<MyBean3, MyBean2> service2 = new AbstractService<MyBean3, MyBean2>();
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The problem with this approach is that MyBean1 does not extend SuperBean<MyBean1>, so it cannot be used in AbstractService. –  Vincent van der Weele Aug 15 '13 at 16:40
    
While this compiles and runs, you can add a MyBean2 instance in a MyBean3 list. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 15 '13 at 16:40
    
@LuiggiMendoza You're right, I'll see if I can tweak it... –  rgettman Aug 15 '13 at 16:44
    
IMO this design is wrong. An abstract more generic class should not change the state of a subclass that points to specific data. Check my first comment on question. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 15 '13 at 16:46
    
@PaulBellora I had to make S extends a raw SuperBean; S extends SuperBean<S> wouldn't work in instantiating an AbstractService. With AbstractService<MyBean2, MyBean1> service = new AbstractService<MyBean2, MyBean1>();, I would get an error that MyBean2 is not within its bound; should extend SuperBean<MyBean2>, but it really extends SuperBean<MyBean3>. That would seem to force another type parameter fit for MyBean3, and this would continue ad infinitum. At somepoint, some type parameter must extend a raw SuperBean, and adding just S here is sufficient. –  rgettman Aug 15 '13 at 18:36

Your generic parameters don't make sense here. If you make the generic types explicit, you can see where it's going wrong:

Add the generic parameter to your SuperBean:

abstract class SuperBean<T extends SuperBean> {
    abstract List<T> getSublist();
}

and make that type explicit in the subtypes:

class MyBean1 extends SuperBean<MyBean2> {
    List<MyBean2> sublist;

    List<MyBean2> getSublist() {
        return sublist;
    }
}

Now, in your service, you would have

class AbstractService<T extends SuperBean<S>> {

    void add(T item) {
        // you cannot do this because the items in the sublist of 
        // your super bean are of the wrong type.
        superBean.getSublist().add(item);
    }
}

The alternative would be to make the service as

class AbstractService<T extends SuperBean<T>>

Then you would be able to add items to the sublist, but your beans are not of the right type. For instance, MyBean1 does not extend SuperBean<MyBean1>, but it extends SuperBean<MyBean2>.

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I'm not sure if this is what you want, but doesn't produce errors.

There are two abstract declarations, SuperBean and AbstractService (though AbstractService is defined, I assume that it should be abstract).

There are three declarations that are not abstract, MyBean{1,2,3}

I define awSuperBean just to see if it works.

The code you pasted doesn't have a (-grr- concrete) superBean defined yet. So, I define a superBean called awSuperBean and use it in the (abstract?) add method.

. .

///  testing superbean implementation
//
class awSuperBean<MyBean1> extends SuperBean {
    List<MyBean1>  getSublist() { return new java.util.ArrayList<MyBean1>(); }
}
//
///

class AbstractService<T extends SuperBean> {

/// tests a superbean definition
//
    awSuperBean<T> asuperBean;

    //this is what I'm aiming for
    void add(T item) {
        // "is not applicable for the arguments (T)"

/// use the superbean
        asuperBean.getSublist().add(item);
    }
}

/// every defined SuperBean subtype will need to specify the type 
//  of SuperBean it will produce in it's getSublist call
// 
abstract class SuperBean<getSublist extends SuperBean> {  

/// use the type parameter
//
    abstract List<getSublist> getSublist();
}

I think you should only use the parametric type identifier, T, in the abstract classes. Use the declared types in the superbean subtype definitions instead of confusing Ts.

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