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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void
getstr(char *&retstr)
{
 char *tmp = (char *)malloc(25);
 strcpy(tmp, "hello,world");
 retstr = tmp;
}

int
main(void)
{
 char *retstr;

 getstr(retstr);
 printf("%s\n", retstr);

 return 0;
}

gcc would not compile this file, but after adding #include <cstring> I could use g++ to compile this source file.

The problem is: does the C programming language support passing pointer argument by reference? If not, why?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Not related to your question, but for curiosity, what's the use case for passing a pointer as a reference? –  Tristram Gräbener Dec 1 '09 at 12:16
1  
@Tristram: if you want the function to be able to modify the pointer, and have the modification propagate beyond the scope of the function. –  Charles Salvia Dec 1 '09 at 12:17
    
If you want to perform malloc of strings in a function that does not free that memory then you could consider using valgrind or equivalent tool to test for memory leaks. –  PP. Dec 1 '09 at 12:18
2  
A reference is a way of confusing programmers as to what is really happening. If you discipline your approach to pointers you'll find that references are not necessary. When dealing with a reference a compiler is taking actions on an object and managing the indirection for you. –  PP. Dec 1 '09 at 12:25
1  
PP: Gross oversimplification of references; any feature can be abused. –  Roger Pate Jan 13 '10 at 15:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

No, C doesn't support references. It is by design. Instead of references you could use pointer to pointer in C. References are available only in C++ language.

share|improve this answer

References are a feature of C++, while C supports only pointers. To have your function modify the value of the given pointer, pass pointer to the pointer:

void getstr(char ** retstr)
{
    char *tmp = (char *)malloc(25);
    strcpy(tmp, "hello,world");
    *retstr = tmp;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *retstr;

    getstr(&retstr);
    printf("%s\n", retstr);

    // Don't forget to free the malloc'd memory
    free(retstr);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Don't cast what malloc() returns. If you've included stdlib.h, it does absolutely nothing. If you haven't, it hides that fact. –  David Thornley Dec 1 '09 at 22:02
3  
As malloc returns void* I find it good practice to cast it explicitly to the required type instead of relying on implicit conversions. If stdlib.h is not included, casting doesn't hide that fact - the compiler will warn you that malloc has not been declared. –  Bojan Resnik Dec 2 '09 at 8:16

Try this:


void
getstr(char **retstr)
{
 char *tmp = (char *)malloc(25);
 strcpy(tmp, "hello,world");
 *retstr = tmp;
}

int
main(void)
{
 char *retstr;

 getstr(&retstr);
 printf("%s\n", retstr);

 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't cast the return value of malloc. It can hide a failure to #include <stdlib.h> (which you did forget in the code above). See c-faq.com/malloc/mallocnocast.html Also, don't forget to check the return value of malloc. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 1 '09 at 21:53
1  
Wow, some people struggle to see the difference between a proof of concept test routine and production code! It was obvious this was a rough-and-ready test routine because there was no corresponding free but I guess some people miss the obvious! –  PP. Dec 2 '09 at 8:13

This should be a comment but it is too long for a comment box, so I am making it CW.

The code you provided can be better written as:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void
getstr(char **retstr)
{
    *retstr = malloc(25);
    if ( *retstr ) {
        strcpy(*retstr, "hello,world");
    }
    return;
}

int
main(void)
{
    char *retstr;

    getstr(&retstr);
    if ( retstr ) {
        printf("%s\n", retstr);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

C lang does not have reference variables but its part of C++ lang.

The reason of introducing reference is to avoid dangling pointers and pre-checking for pointers nullity.

You can consider reference as constant pointer i.e. const pointer can only point to data it has been initialized to point.

share|improve this answer
    
The other difference (besides the syntactic ones) is that references cannot be null. –  David Thornley Dec 1 '09 at 22:01

There is an interesting trick in libgmp which emulates references: typedef mpz_t __mpz_struct[1];

and then you can write like this:

mpz_t n;
mpz_init(n);
...
mpz_clear(n);

I would not recommend to use this method, because it may be incomprehensible for others, it still does not protect from being a NULL: mpz_init((void *)NULL), and it is as much verbose as its pointer-to-pointer counterpart.

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