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The requirement is to load 50 records in paging with all 65 columns of table "empl" with minimum IO. There are 280000+ records in table. There is only one clustered index over the PK.

Pagination query is as following:

WITH result_set AS (    
SELECT    
ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY  e.[uon] DESC ) AS [row_number], e.*    
FROM    
empl e with (NOLOCK)    
LEFT JOIN empl_add ea with (NOLOCK)    
ON ea.ptid = e.ptid    
WHERE    
e.del = 0 AND e.pub = 1 AND e.sid = 2
AND e.md = 0     
AND e.tid = 3    
AND e.coid = 2     
AND (e.cid = 102)
AND ea.ptgid IN (SELECT ptgid FROM empl_dep where psid = 1001
AND ib = 1)) 
SELECT  
*  
FROM  
result_set  
WHERE  
[row_number] BETWEEN 0 AND 50

Following are the stats after running the above query from profiler:

CPU: 1500, Reads: 25576, Duration: 25704

Then I put the following index over the table empl:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [ci_empl]
ON [dbo].[empl] ([del],[md],[pub],[tid],[coid],[sid],[ptid],[cid],[uon])
GO

After putting index CPU and Reads are still higher. I don't know what's wrong with the index or something wrong with the query?

Edit:

The following query is also taking high reads after putting index. And there are only 3 columns and 1 count.

SELECT TOP (2147483647)
ame.aid ID, ame.name name,         
COUNT(empl.pid) [Count], ps.uff uff FROM ame with (NOLOCK)        
JOIN pam AS pa WITH (NOLOCK) ON pa.aid = ame.aid         
JOIN empl WITH (NOLOCK) ON empl.pid = pa.pid         
LEFT JOIN psam AS ps
ON ps.psid = 1001
AND ps.aid = ame.aid
LEFT JOIN empl_add ea with (NOLOCK)        
ON ea.ptid = empl.ptid        
WHERE 
empl.del = 0 AND empl.pub = 1 AND empl.sid = 2
AND empl.md = 0         
AND (empl.tid = 3)        
AND (empl.coid = 2)        
AND (empl.cid = 102)        
AND ea.ptgid IN (SELECT ptgid FROM empl_dep where psid = 1001
AND ib = 1)        
AND ame.pub = 1 AND ame.del = 0        
GROUP BY ame.aid, ame.name, ps.uff        
ORDER BY ame.name ASC

Second Edit:

Now I had put the following index on "uon" column:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [ci_empl_uon]
ON [dbo].[empl] (uon)
GO

But still CPU and Reads are Higher.

Third Edit:

DTA is suggesting me index with all columns included for the first query so I altered the suggested index convert it to a filter index for the basic four filters to make it more effective.

I added the line below after Include while creating the index.

Where e.del = 0 AND e.pub = 1 AND e.sid = 2 AND e.md = 0 AND e.coid = 2

But still the reads are high on both development and production machine.

Fourth Edit:

Now I had come to a solution that has improved the performance, but still not up to the goal. The key is that it's not going for ALL THE DATA.

The query is a following:

WITH result_set AS (    
SELECT    
ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY  e.[uon] DESC ) AS [row_number], e.pID pID   
FROM    
empl e with (NOLOCK)    
LEFT JOIN empl_add ea with (NOLOCK)    
ON ea.ptid = e.ptid    
WHERE    
e.del = 0 AND e.pub = 1 AND e.sid = 2
AND e.md = 0     
AND e.tid = 3    
AND e.coid = 2     
AND (e.cid = 102)
AND ea.ptgid IN (SELECT ptgid FROM empl_dep where psid = 1001
AND ib = 1)) 
SELECT  
*  
FROM  
result_set join empl on result_set.pID = empl.pID
WHERE  
[row_number] BETWEEN @start AND @end

And recreated the index with key column alterations, include and filter:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [ci_empl]
ON [dbo].[empl] ([ptid],[cid],[tid],[uon])
INCLUDE ([pID])
Where 
[coID] = 2 and
[sID] = 2 and
[pub] = 1 and
[del] = 0 and
[md] = 0
GO

It improves the performance, but not up to the goal.

share|improve this question
    
You're selecting all columns from the table using SELECT * - so that index will most likely not help, since the SQL engine would have to go back to the data pages (the clustered index) from that nonclustered index to fetch all columns --> those are expensive key lookups, which often cause the query optimizer to use a (clustered) index scan instead –  marc_s Aug 15 '13 at 17:21
    
Why do you think an index on all of your columns will reduce the number of reads? Do you think the index stores less data than the table now? Why would it? It contains a copy of all the data! If I copy my music library to a second computer, should it take up less disk space? –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 15 '13 at 17:23
    
@Aaron: Index is only on key columns, not all columns. –  Prakash Aug 15 '13 at 17:53
    
You still have to read ALL OF THE DATA because you are using SELECT *. The index will help you to locate the rows faster, but SQL Server still has to return ALL OF THE DATA, not just the data in the index. If an e-mail address isn't in the index, and you're using SELECT *, how do you think SQL Server will return the e-mail address with the query? Magic? No, it has to go read it using a lookup or a scan depending on whether the index is actually used. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 15 '13 at 17:56
    
@Aaron: But it is basic requirement to have all columns. –  Prakash Aug 15 '13 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

You are selecting the top 50 rows ordered by e.uon desc. An index that starts with uon will speed up the query:

create index IX_Empl_Uon on dbo.empl (uon)

The index will allow SQL Server to scan the top N rows of a this index. N is the highest number in your pagination: for the 3rd page of 50 elements, N equals 150. SQL Server then does 50 key lookups to retrieve the full rows from the clustered index. As far as I know, this is a textbook example of where an index can make a big difference.

Not all query optimizers will be smart enough to notice that row_number() over ... as rn with where rn between 1 and 50 means the top 50 rows. But SQL Server 2012 does. It uses the index both for first and consecutive pages, like row_number() between 50 and 99.

share|improve this answer
    
If it does a range scan (disguised as a seek) on that index to find the 50 rows, it will need to do 50 lookups to get the rest of the columns, so it could be a wash (way too many "it depends" to know for sure). –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 15 '13 at 17:35
    
@AaronBertrand: 50 lookups should beat a 300k row scan. To me it looks like a textbook example of where an index would be useful. –  Andomar Aug 15 '13 at 17:40
    
@Andomar Requirement is Table Pagination not only Top 50 rows. –  Prakash Aug 15 '13 at 17:43
    
As I said, there are a lot of variables here. That index might help, and it may reduce reads, but it may not reduce duration, for example. –  Aaron Bertrand Aug 15 '13 at 17:44
    
@AaronBertrand: Could you give a specific example where the addition of this index would increase query duration? –  Andomar Aug 15 '13 at 17:50

You are trying to find the X through X+Nth row from a dataset, based on an order specified by column uon.

I’m assuming here that uon is the mentioned primary key. If not, without an index where uon is the first (if not only) column, a table scan is inevitable.

Next wrinkle: You don’t want that direct span of columns, you want that span of columns as filtered by a fairly extensive assortment of filters. The clustered index might pull the first 50 columns, but the WHERE may filter none, some, or all of those out. More will almost certainly have to read in order to "fill your span".

More fun: you perform a left outer join on table empl_add (e.g. retaing the empl row even if there is no empl_add found), and then require filter out all rows where empladd.ptgid is not found in the subquery. Might as well make this an inner join, it may speed things up and certainly will not make them slower. It is also a "filtering factor" that cannot be addressed with an index on table empl.

So: as I see it (i.e. I’m not testing it all out locally), SQL has to first assemble the data, filter out the invalid rows (which involves table joins), order what remains, and return that span of rows you are interested in. I believe that, with or without the index on uon, SQL is identifying a need to read all the data and filter/sort before it can pick out the desired range.

(Your new index would appear to be insufficient. The sixth column is sid, but sid is not referenced in the query, so it might only be able to help “so far”. This raises lots of questions about data cardinality and whatnot, at which point I defer to @Aarons’ point that we have insufficient information on the overall problem set for a full analysis.)

share|improve this answer
    
"uon" is a DateTime column, "pid" is the primary key. –  Prakash Aug 15 '13 at 18:55
    
"stid" was "sid". I had rectified the same. –  Prakash Aug 15 '13 at 19:20
    
If you want (say) the first 50 rows of a table as ordered by column uon, and there is no index on column uon, then SQL will have to read all the rows in the table in order to find the "first" 50. –  Philip Kelley Aug 15 '13 at 20:16
    
After putting the index over "uon" CPU and reads are still higher. :( –  Prakash Aug 16 '13 at 8:15
    
Just for testing purposes, try running it (1) without the filter on column ea.ptgid, and (2) without any of the joins. As per my answer, that having to factor in ea.ptgid as aprt of the filter will all but require the tables to be joined (and the data retrieved) before filtering can be performed. –  Philip Kelley Aug 16 '13 at 13:46

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