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I would like to pass a primitive (int, bool, ...) by reference. I found a discussion about it (paragraph "Passing value types by reference") here: value types in Dart, but I still wonder if there is a way to do it in Dart (except using an object wrapper) ? Any development ?

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I'm curious, what is your use case? Why do you want to do this? –  Shailen Tuli Aug 16 '13 at 3:06
    
@ShailenTuli You equate all by yourself? What is the difference why? We all live once and all people are different. And we all have different interests. There are things that we use very rarely. But this does not mean that they do not need. –  mezoni Aug 16 '13 at 6:38
    
I am sorry, but I don't understand the comment. I'm simply trying to understand the intent of the questioner. –  Shailen Tuli Aug 16 '13 at 7:37
    
I am not surprised (curious) that someone needs it. Also, I'm not surprised that is missing in the Dart language. It is useful, but not critical. –  mezoni Aug 16 '13 at 8:49
    
@mezoni Understanding why someone wants to do something allows for suggesting alternative means of achieving the same effect. –  Pixel Elephant Aug 16 '13 at 15:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The Dart language does not support this and I doubt it ever will, but the future will tell.

Primitives will be passed by value, and as already mentioned here, the only way to 'pass primitives by reference' is by wrapping them like:

class PrimitiveWrapper {
  var value;
  PrimitiveWrapper(this.value);
}

void alter(PrimitiveWrapper data) {
  data.value++;
}

main() {
  var data = new PrimitiveWrapper(5);
  print(data.value); // 5
  alter(data);
  print(data.value); // 6
}

If you don't want to do that, then you need to find another way around your problem.

One case where I see people needing to pass by reference is that they have some sort of value they want to pass to functions in a class:

class Foo {
  void doFoo() {
    var i = 0;
    ...
    doBar(i); // We want to alter i in doBar().
    ...
    i++;
  }

  void doBar(i) {
    i++;
  }
}

In this case you could just make i a class member instead.

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Your wrapper is not generic but the language allow this improvement. –  mezoni Aug 16 '13 at 12:46
    
If you are into generics, sure go ahead. I believe this is the simplest way to explain the point. :) –  Kai Sellgren Aug 16 '13 at 12:49
    
Your answer - The Dart language does not support this and I doubt it ever will. What the problem? This is possible to implement this feature in Dart and in Dart2JS. Many proposed features can be implemented and structured for effective compilation into Javascript. The problem in that the Dart team focused on the fixing bugs and web client improvements. I think this would be implemented in future. I not found problems that prevent this. I think that your work is far from compiler design? I am right? –  mezoni Aug 16 '13 at 17:10
    
I never said there were problems. I doubt means that I doubt the feature arrives. This is solely an opinion, which I base on what I've heard and seen in the Dart world so far. Dart has a certain group it targets and certain use cases. The feature might arrive in the future or not, and it's pointless to speculate. It's like speculating weather it will be possible to define variance for types. I doubt it will ever be possible, but I can't know that. –  Kai Sellgren Aug 16 '13 at 19:17
    
From the link in @Eric’s question: “The absence of pass by value is not due to the interactions with Javascript. It's a core part of the object model. It's the same in Smalltalk, in Ruby, in Java etc. Object are passed by reference.” –  Benji XVI Feb 5 at 15:05

This is not possible but I solve this problem by wrapping the value into the List or into the Wrapper.

import 'dart:math';

void main() {  
  print(result());
}

String result() {
  var result = [null];
  if(!tryYourLuck(result)) {
    result = ['You lose.'];    
  }

  return result[0];
}

bool tryYourLuck(List<String> result) {
  var random = new Random(); 
  if(random.nextBool()) {
    result[0] = 'You win.';
    return true;
  }  

  return false;
}

Or you may create the Wrapper class for this purpose.

import 'dart:math';

void main() {  
  print(result()); 
}

String result() {
  var result = new Wrapper<String>.empty();
  if(!tryYourLuck(result)) {
    result.value = 'You lose.';    
  }

  return result.value;
}

bool tryYourLuck(Wrapper<String> result) {
  var random = new Random(); 
  if(random.nextBool()) {
    result.value = 'You win.';
    return true;
  }  

  return false;
}

class Wrapper<T> {
  bool _initialized = false;
  T _value;

  Wrapper(this._value) {
    _initialized = true;
  }

  Wrapper.empty();

  T get value {
    if(!_initialized) {
      throw new StateError('Wrapped value ​​are not initialized');
    }

    return _value;
  }

  void set value(T value) {
    _initialized = true;
    _value = value;
  }
}
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No, wrappers are the only way.

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They are passed by reference. It just doesn't matter because the "primitive" types don't have methods to change their internal value.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but maybe you are misunderstanding what "passing by reference" means? I'm assuming you want to do something like param1 = 10 and want this value to still be 10 when you return from your method. But references aren't pointers. When you assign the parameter a new value (with = operator), this change won't be reflected in the calling method. This is still true with non-primitive types (classes).

Example:

class Test {
  int val;
  Test(this.val);
}

void main() {
  Test t = new Test(1);
  fn1(t);
  print(t.val); // 2
  fn2(t);
  print(t.val); // still 2, because "t" has been assigned a new instance in fn2()
}

void fn1(Test t) {
  print(t.val); // 1
  t.val = 2;
}

void fn2(Test t) {
  t = new Test(10);
  print(t.val); // 10
}

EDIT I tried to make my answer more clear, based on the comments, but somehow I can't seem to phrase it right without causing more confusion. Basically, when someone coming from Java says "parameters are passed by reference", they mean what a C/C++ developer would mean by saying "parameters are passed as pointers".

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@mezoni: Isn't your definition exactly what "passing by reference" means? If parameters were passed by value, fn1() in my example wouldn't work the way it does, would it? –  MarioP Aug 16 '13 at 9:07
    
Well, my point was that there aren't any real primitive types in Dart. num, int, double, bool - those are all objects and behave the same as "complex" classes when passed around as parameters. Also, I think we both mean the same thing, just naming it differently. By "pass by reference" I mean the reference to the object is passed around and changes of the object members remain after the funcion returns. Are we on the same page now? :) –  MarioP Aug 16 '13 at 9:51
    
If anyone has any idea how I can make this more clear in my answer, feel free to edit it, because I honestly have no idea how I should phrase that. :-/ –  MarioP Aug 16 '13 at 10:27
    
@mezoni Ah, now I get it. I am using Java terminology, where "pass by reference" doesn't have the same meaning as in C/C++, for example. I'll edit my answer to reflect that difference, if I can think of a way to not make it even more confusing. :-S –  MarioP Aug 16 '13 at 11:11
    
I thought that "pass by copy/value" meant "send a copy, the original can't be modified" and that "pass by reference" meant "send the object/address itself, it can be modified". –  Eric Lavoie Aug 16 '13 at 15:51

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