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I follow a pattern of creating UITableView's in MonoTouch (Xamarin.iOS) by setting the .Source property to a new instance of a nested UITableViewSource class as shown below. The concern brought to my attention by another developer is that this UITableView class will never get garbage collected because of the nested class's reference to the parent class through the _parentController property assigned in the constructor of the nested class. The belief is that as long as the nested class is holding this reference the parent class will be unable to get collected.

Can anyone confirm if this is true and by creating UITableView's in this manner is not a good programming practice as garbage collection will be unable to free the resources? (some methods and constructors left out for conciseness.

public partial class MyViewController : UITableViewController
{
   public override ViewDidLoad()
   {
      base.ViewDidLoad();
      this.TableView.Source = new ViewSource(this);
   }

   public class ViewSource : UITableViewSource
   {
      MyViewController _parentController;
      public ViewSource(MyViewController parentController)
      {
         _parentController = parentController;
      }
   }
}
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It will be released.

The reason is that the "Source" property is a weak property in Objective-C, which means that the assignment there does not call retain on the object, it merely keeps a reference to it.

Strong cycles that would prevent GC from happening only happen if Objective-C calls retain on the passed object.

The following example shows how the data is eventually released, you have to first drill down a bunch of times, then drill back up.

public class MyViewController : UITableViewController {
    public override void ViewDidLoad()
    {
        base.ViewDidLoad();
        this.TableView.Source = new ViewSource(this);
    }

    public class ViewSource : UITableViewSource
    {
        public override int RowsInSection (UITableView tableview, int section)
        {
            return 100;
        }

        public override UITableViewCell GetCell (UITableView tableView, NSIndexPath indexPath)
        {
            return new UITableViewCell (UITableViewCellStyle.Default, "foo");
        }

        public override void RowSelected (UITableView tableView, NSIndexPath indexPath)
        {
            var n = AppDelegate.window.RootViewController as UINavigationController;
            n.PushViewController (new MyViewController (), true);
            GC.Collect ();
        }
        MyViewController _parentController;
        public ViewSource(MyViewController parentController)
        {
            _parentController = parentController;
        }
    }
    ~MyViewController ()
    {
        Console.WriteLine ("Disposing");
    }
}

[Register ("AppDelegate")]
public partial class AppDelegate : UIApplicationDelegate
{
    public static UIWindow window;
    public override bool FinishedLaunching (UIApplication app, NSDictionary options)
    {
        window = new UIWindow (UIScreen.MainScreen.Bounds);

        var myViewController = new MyViewController ();
        window.RootViewController = new UINavigationController (myViewController);
        window.MakeKeyAndVisible ();
        return true;
    }
}
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If the Source property is weak, what happens if you just have: this.TableView.Source=new ViewSource() , ie with no parent class reference? That would mean Source could be released in the very next line? –  Bbx Aug 31 '13 at 9:39
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