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I've been tooling around with Ruby by converting a pen and paper RPG to a script.

Right now I have a character's stats kept in a hash, which I would like to be able to set via public method. I got that working with:

class Character
    attr_reader :str, :con, :dex, :wis, :int, :level, :mods, :stats
    def initialize str, con, dex, wis, int, cha, level = 1
        @stats = { :str => str, :con => con, :dex => dex, :wis => wis, :int => int, :cha => cha }
        @mods = {}
        @level = level

        @stats.each_pair do |key, value|
            @mods[key] = ((value / 2 ) -5).floor
        end
    end

    def []=(index, value)
        @stats[index] = value
    end
end

This allows me to instantiate a new character, then update @stats by running newChar.stats[:str] = 12

However, I also seem to be able to modify the @mods using this method as well, which is undesirable. newChar.mods[:str] = 15 will successfully alter the @mods hash, which from my understanding should not be possible with the current setter method.

On a slightly separate note, the iterator I'm using to create my @mods hash seems clunky but I haven't found anything better to accomplish the task.

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1  
To generate mods, I think you want `@mods = Hash[@stats.map {|k,v| [k, (v / 2 - 5).floor] }] –  Chuck Aug 15 '13 at 19:09
    
@Chuck awesome, thank you. I looked for a map method in http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/Hash.html but did not see one. What exactly is that construct that you wrapped the whole thing in? The Hash[...] –  Nick Brown Aug 15 '13 at 23:08
    
Ahhh, nevermind, I see now. I didn't find it in the Hash documentation because it's part of the included Enumerable module. –  Nick Brown Aug 15 '13 at 23:17
    
The Hash[] is the [] method of the Hash class, which creates a hash out of either the argument list (if you provide multiple arguments) or the passed array (if you pass an array, like we're doing here). –  Chuck Aug 16 '13 at 0:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You did not even call your []= method in your example. This would be done like so:

newChar[:str] = 123

instead of

newChar.stats[:str] = 123

so to call newChar.stats[:str] = 123 you do not even need you method definition. The reason is that newChar.stats as well as newChar.mods will both return the actual hash which can then be altered.

One possible workaround is to freeze the @mods variable so it can't be altered any more:

def initialize str, con, dex, wis, int, cha, level = 1
    # omitted ...

    @stats.each_pair do |key, value|
        @mods[key] = ((value / 2 ) -5).floor
    end

    @mods.freeze
end

This is a good solution if you never want to be able to change @mods again. Trying to set a value will result in an error:

newChar.mods[:con] = 123
# RuntimeError: can't modify frozen Hash

Inside your class, you can, however, overwrite @mods entirely.

To summarize, the full class would be:

class Character
    attr_reader :str, :con, :dex, :wis, :int, :level, :mods, :stats
    def initialize str, con, dex, wis, int, cha, level = 1
        @stats = { :str => str, :con => con, :dex => dex, :wis => wis, :int => int, :cha => cha }
        @mods = {}
        @level = level

        @stats.each_pair do |key, value|
            @mods[key] = ((value / 2 ) -5).floor
        end

        @mods.freeze
    end
end
share|improve this answer
    
The freeze method looks promising, thank you. I guess what I'm confused about then is why I can newChar.stats[:str] = 12 without any sort of setter method present. Shouldn't I not have access to a property unless a setter method is defined? I also notice that if I remove :stats from attr_reader, I can no longer set the property as well, which may be because, as you said, it will no longer return the hash for me to operate on. –  Nick Brown Aug 15 '13 at 19:06
    
@NickBrown: newChar.stats returns the value stored in @stats, which is just a Hash. It doesn't return some special "property" — it just returns the Hash that was stored in the @stats instance variable. Hash already has a []= method, which is how you normally put things in a Hash. –  Chuck Aug 15 '13 at 19:09
    
Well think of it like that: You cannot set the hash itself, but that does not mean that you cannot call methods on the hash. Now the Hash class happens to implement a method []= which lets you set values on the hash. –  Patrick Oscity Aug 15 '13 at 19:09

If you need a public getter for a hash but you don't want the user to modify the hash –the instance-variable of your class–, you can do it with dup.

class MyClass
  ....
  def my_hash
    @my_hash.dup
  end
end

Where the solution with freeze, as mentioned above, will freeze the hash even for your class, the .dup-solution will let you modify the hash from within your class but not from outside.

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