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currently I'm facing an SQL challenge and wondering, if my approach is correct at all. Let's consider the following simplified data model:

Table CAT:
----------
ID
COLOR

Table DOMESTIC_CAT:
-------------------
CAT_ID
DOMESTIC_ATTRIBUTE

Table PERSIAN_CAT:
------------------
CAT_ID
PERSIAN_ATTRIBUTE

And let's suppose we have the following data in the tables:

Table CAT:
ID   COLOR
--------------
1    'BLACK'
2    'WHITE'
3    'BLACK'
4    'WHITE'
5    'BLACK'
6    'RED'
7    'WHITE'
8    'WHITE'
9    'RED'
10   'BLACK'

Table DOMESTIC_CAT:
CAT_ID    DOMESTIC_ATTRIBUTE
----------------------------
1         'Domestic1'
2         'Domestic2'
3         'Domestic3'
7         'Domestic4'
8         'Domestic5'

Table PERSIAN_CAT
CAT_ID    PERSIAN_ATTRIBUTE
---------------------------
4         'Persian1'
5         'Persian2'
6         'Persian3'
9         'Persian4'
10        'Persian5'

I would like to perform an aggregation query with the following result:

CAT_TYPE       CAT_COLOR   COUNT
---------------------------------
'DOMESTIC_CAT'    'BLACK'       2
'DOMESTIC_CAT'    'WHITE'       3
'PERSIAN_CAT'     'WHITE'       1
'PERSIAN_CAT'     'BLACK'       2
'PERSIAN_CAT'     'RED'         2

As you can see, I want to group the 'count'-result by the following values: - the fact, whether the given cat is domestic or persian - the cat's color

The first one is the hard thing - I actually don't know if it's possible at all to perform a "group by joined table"? I'm breaking my head but cannot find any solution :( The actual RDBMS used would be Oracle 11.

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5 Answers 5

You can use outer joins from cat to both the other tables, and determine which table got a match, and use that to populate your cat_type column:

select case when dc.cat_id is not null then 'DOMESTIC_CAT'
    when pc.cat_id is not null then 'PERSIAN_CAT' end as cat_type,
  c.color,
  count(*) as "COUNT"
from cat c
left join domestic_cat dc on dc.cat_id = c.id
left join persian_cat pc on pc.cat_id = c.id
group by case when dc.cat_id is not null then 'DOMESTIC_CAT'
    when pc.cat_id is not null then 'PERSIAN_CAT' end,
  c.color
order by 1,2;

SQL Fiddle.

Depending on your real-world problem this might perform better than the inner join/union option, but you'd probably need to try both to see which is better (faster, more efficient, more maintainable...).

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Just do

SELECT 'DOMESTIC_CAT', c.color, count(*)
FROM domestic_cat d INNER JOIN cat c ON c.id = d.cat_id
GROUP BY c.color
UNION ALL
SELECT 'PERSIAN_CAT' .... the same for the other table
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Another approach(Oracle 11g and higher):

select cat_type
     , color
     , cat_cnt
  from (select c.color
             , count(dc.domestic_attribute) as domestic_cat
             , count(pc.persian_attribute)  as persian_cat
         from cat c
         left join domestic_cat dc
           on (c.id1 = dc.cat_id)
         left join persian_cat  pc
           on (c.id1 = pc.cat_id)
        group by c.color
        )
unpivot(
  cat_cnt for  cat_type in (domestic_cat, persian_cat)
)
order by cat_type

Result:

CAT_TYPE           COLOR    CAT_CNT
------------------------------------
DOMESTIC_CAT    RED         0
DOMESTIC_CAT    WHITE       3
DOMESTIC_CAT    BLACK       2
PERSIAN_CAT     WHITE       1
PERSIAN_CAT     BLACK       2
PERSIAN_CAT     RED         2

SQLFiddle demo

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Not much different than the response from angus, but I prefer:

select ct.cat_type, c.color, count(*)
from cat c
    inner join (
        select 'DOMESTIC_CAT' cat_type, cat_id
        from domestic_cat
        union all
        select 'PERSIAN_CAT' cat_type, cat_id
        from persian_cat
    ) ct
        on ct.cat_id = c.id
group by ct.cat_type, c.color
order by ct.cat_type, c.color;

This will only hit the cat table once, and will not have as much repeated code to maintain.

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It's better. He should probably have a view with all those tables concatenated, if he's going to use them like that. –  angus Aug 16 '13 at 16:14
WITH cat_types AS (
  SELECT CASE
         WHEN EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM domestic_cat d WHERE d.cat_id = c.id )
         THEN 'Domestic_Cat'
         WHEN EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM persian_cat d WHERE d.cat_id = c.id )
         THEN 'Persian_Cat'
         ELSE 'Unknown_Cat' END AS Cat_Type,
         id,
         color
  FROM   cat c
)
SELECT Cat_Type,
       Color,
       COUNT( 1 ) AS cat_cnt
FROM   cat_types
GROUP BY Cat_Type, color
ORDER BY Cat_Type, cat_cnt;

SQLFIDDLE

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