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Section 2 of the Unix manual covers system calls (though they might actually be implemented by the system libc - fork(2) on Linux for example). The following is a very dumb example that calls open(2) and close(2).

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int
main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int fd;

  fd = open("/dev/null", O_APPEND);
  close(fd);
}

It's been a while since I've written a lot of C++ code. I'm curious if C++ libraries now have a more C++ way to access these functions w/o having to include a lot of C header files? The code above is straight C essentially.

The lower level functions are still useful if you want to move file descriptors around (make sure fd's 0, 1 and 2 are what you want them to be) or do ioctls, etc. But enums and some better typing might be nice for the args.

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What do you mean by the C++ way? When there are so MANY wasys to choose from. Perhaps you mean << and >> ? –  Jiminion Aug 15 '13 at 20:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm curious if C++ libraries now have a more C++ way to access these functions w/o having to include a lot of C header files?

They don't, since those functions are provided by POSIX and not a feature of the language. What is provided, however, are iostream abstractions (C++98, chapter 27) which do much of the common functionality of the "section 2" open()/close()/read()/write() calls.

C++11 provides yet more abstractions which cover more of the functionality provided by the POSIX, Windows (etc) APIs.

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As documented here? Perhaps fstream as well? –  Kevin Lyda Aug 15 '13 at 21:37
1  
Yes, those are the ones. –  Brian Cain Aug 15 '13 at 21:51

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