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It may be a dumb question but I need to ask and clear this up for myself.

To submit a block onto a queue for execution, use the functions dispatch_sync and dispatch_async. They both take a queue and a block as parameters. dispatch_async returns immediately, running the block asynchronously, while dispatch_sync blocks execution until the provided block returns. Here are some situations:

Situation 1

dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0ul);    
dispatch_async(queue, ^{
    [self goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved];
    dispatch_async(queue, ^{
        NSLog(@"this is statement1");

    });
});

Situation 2

dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0ul);    
dispatch_sync(queue, ^{
    [self goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved];
    dispatch_sync(queue, ^{
        NSLog(@"this is statement1");

    });
});

Situation 3

{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0ul);    
    dispatch_async(queue, ^{
        [self goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved];
        dispatch_sync(queue, ^{
            NSLog(@"this is statement1");

        });
    });

Situation 4

{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0ul);    
    dispatch_sync(queue, ^{
        [self goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved];
        dispatch_async(queue, ^{
            NSLog(@"this is statement1");

        });
    });

}

And goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved is

-(void)goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved {
    NSLog(@"goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved");
}

I tried to run them in Xcode but I cant see the difference at all.

So my questions are:

  1. What's the main difference between these situations?
  2. What if I replace queue with dispatch_get_main_queue()?
share|improve this question
1  
When you say 'you can't see the difference', what do you mean? Difference in speed of execution? Given that your goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved method will take nanoseconds, I'm not surprised if you can't see a speed difference. –  davidf2281 Aug 15 '13 at 21:28
1  
Have you tried setting breakpoints in and around the blocks? –  Sebastian Aug 15 '13 at 21:55
    
writing a long post vs. reading Apple's docs, 1:0, but... the second one would have been easier. developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Darwin/Reference/… –  holex Aug 17 '13 at 22:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The dispatch_sync statement waits until the block it covers is executed completely. dispatch_async returns immediately and proceeds to the next line of code, so everything inside is happening in parallel.

If queue was a serial queue created by yourself, then:

Situation 1 - The root block returns immediately. Inside it waits for [self go....], and then goes to dispatch_async, which returns immediately as well.

Situation 2 - If queue was a serial queue, then there would be a dead lock since it will wait for itself to finish executing. Since you are dealing with asynchronous one, that block will be executed in parallel. (Thanks, @Ken Thomases)

Situation 3 - No need in dispatch_sync here. It causes the deadlock.

Situation 4 - Waits for [self ...], then returns immediately.

If you replace the queue with main queue, then remember to not dispatch_sync on main queue, because it will cause a deadlock (it will not if dispatched not from main thread, thanks @Ken Thomases).

To understand it better, replace your function with:

-(void)goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved:(NSString *)message {
    for(int i = 0; i < 50; ++i) {
        NSLog(@"%@ -> %d", message, i); 
    }
}

You will clearly see what's going on every time, whether it waits or not. Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
@ dreamzor: all are clear but situation 2. the outer dispatch_sync will wait for its block. Firstly, goDoSomethingLongAndInvoled is completed (goDoSomethingLongAndInvolved will be shown out ) then next is inner dispatch_sync. Like said, it will wait for NSLog(@"this is statement1") completed. Now this is statement will be printed out. So dispatch_sync is done. Eventually, outer dispatch_sync is done. That is why I am confused why it causes deadlock at here. –  tranvutuan Aug 16 '13 at 2:19
1  
Situation 2 does not cause a deadlock. It would if the queue were a serial queue, but it's not. So, the inner task can run even while the outer task is still in-progress. It's also not true that dispatch_sync() to the main queue will always deadlock. It will only deadlock if it was dispatched from the main thread. That makes the main thread wait for itself. –  Ken Thomases Aug 16 '13 at 6:09
    
You guys are right, I'm sorry. I usually create my own serial queue, so it was based on such an experience :) –  dreamzor Aug 16 '13 at 9:08
1  
If you correct your claim about situation 2 in the answer, I'll remove my downvote. –  Ken Thomases Aug 16 '13 at 19:32

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