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I am totally new to python and I am trying to implement quick sort in it. Could someone please help me complete my code?

I do not know how to concatenate the three arrays and printing them.

def sort(array=[12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15]):
    less = []
    equal = []
    greater = []

    if len(array) > 1:
        pivot = array[0]
        for x in array:
            if x < pivot:
                less.append(x)
            if x == pivot:
                equal.append(x)
            if x > pivot:
                greater.append(x)
            sort(less)
            sort(pivot)
            sort(greater)
share|improve this question
1  
You can concatenate arrays by just adding: all = less + pivot + greater Or if you just want to print them: print less + pivot + greater – kto Aug 15 '13 at 21:40
1  
pivot is a number, so it cannot be added to less. You need to wrap it in a list first. – Bas Swinckels Aug 15 '13 at 21:49
    
is it fair to say that since data often comes partially sorted and this implementation simply chooses the first element, this may lead to higher average runtimes than the expected average O(N logN)? – Chrispy Dec 28 '15 at 7:08
    
in case this is helpful, I found this explanation helped clarify why the logN in O(N logN): stackoverflow.com/a/10425578/2392486 – Chrispy Dec 28 '15 at 7:09
    
bing.com/… – YOU Jun 18 at 12:58

19 Answers 19

up vote 60 down vote accepted
def sort(array=[12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15]):
    less = []
    equal = []
    greater = []

    if len(array) > 1:
        pivot = array[0]
        for x in array:
            if x < pivot:
                less.append(x)
            if x == pivot:
                equal.append(x)
            if x > pivot:
                greater.append(x)
        # Don't forget to return something!
        return sort(less)+equal+sort(greater)  # Just use the + operator to join lists
    # Note that you want equal ^^^^^ not pivot
    else:  # You need to hande the part at the end of the recursion - when you only have one element in your array, just return the array.
        return array
share|improve this answer
    
@user2687481 Could you either add that to this question, or write a new question? It's too hard to tell what your code says, since the comment box removes the formatting and whitespace. – Brionius Aug 16 '13 at 4:55
3  
Very pythonic and easy to read. The answer by @zangw produced triplicates in my test. This is the best answer. – Andrew Sledge May 1 '14 at 16:37
3  
You could also swap out the 2nd ifs in the for loop with elif and else to avoid doing unnecessary comparisons – MaxMarchuk Aug 13 '15 at 17:11
1  
This is sound like merge sort not quick sort – Emad Mokhtar Nov 3 '15 at 12:45
3  
It's actually the best and most readable python code I found for quicksort anywhere. No indices, no helper functions, clearly shows the gist of the algorithm (divide and conquer). (The default value for the array is rather unnecessary) – cmantas Dec 28 '15 at 22:50

There is another concise and beautiful version

def qsort(arr): 
     if len(arr) <= 1:
          return arr
     else:
          return qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x<arr[0]]) + [arr[0]] + qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x>=arr[0]])
share|improve this answer
    
I love this -thanks! – Kerry Jones Jan 1 at 21:02
1  
@zangw possible reasons for a downvote: 1) Quadratic runtime on already sorted or reversed arrays 2) The solution is not in-place. Therefore, a terrible implementation, sorry. – all3fox Jan 13 at 8:35
5  
Not very readable. – Aspen Jan 15 at 2:41
    
not readable at all, are you truly trying to minimize the number of lines? Code is interpreted by machines, but understood by humans. – jsmedmar Mar 16 at 3:52
    
Somehow I love this way... – Huy Vo Apr 3 at 10:23

Quick sort without additional memory (in place)

Usage:

array = [97, 200, 100, 101, 211, 107]
quicksort(array)
# array -> [97, 100, 101, 107, 200, 211]
def partition(array, begin, end):
    pivot = begin
    for i in xrange(begin+1, end+1):
        if array[i] <= array[begin]:
            pivot += 1
            array[i], array[pivot] = array[pivot], array[i]
    array[pivot], array[begin] = array[begin], array[pivot]
    return pivot


def quicksort(array, begin=0, end=None):
    if end is None:
        end = len(array) - 1
    if begin >= end:
        return
    pivot = partition(array, begin, end)
    quicksort(array, begin, pivot-1)
    quicksort(array, pivot+1, end)
share|improve this answer
    
Simple and efficient by taking advantage of the in memory ordering. Great! – gl051 Feb 11 '15 at 2:26
    
Typical implement, it helps me a lot. Thanks. – Tardis Xu Aug 11 '15 at 8:11

There are many answers to this already, but I think this approach is the most clean implementation:

def quicksort(arr):
    """ Quicksort a list

    :type arr: list
    :param arr: List to sort
    :returns: list -- Sorted list
    """
    if not arr:
        return []

    pivots = [x for x in arr if x == arr[0]]
    lesser = quicksort([x for x in arr if x < arr[0]])
    greater = quicksort([x for x in arr if x > arr[0]])

    return lesser + pivots + greater

You can of course skip storing everything in variables and return them straight away like this:

def quicksort(arr):
    """ Quicksort a list

    :type arr: list
    :param arr: List to sort
    :returns: list -- Sorted list
    """
    if not arr:
        return []

    return quicksort([x for x in arr if x < arr[0]]) \
        + [x for x in arr if x == arr[0]] \
        + quicksort([x for x in arr if x > arr[0]])
share|improve this answer
3  
O(N!)? is this a 'slowSort'? – Scott 混合理论 Nov 17 '14 at 4:11
3  
I believe in the first code example it should be 'lesser' and 'greater' instead of '[lesser]' and '[greater]' - else you'll end up with nested lists instead of a flat one. – Alice Jan 15 '15 at 19:56
    
@Scott混合理论 I'm still learning time complexity, can you elaborate why this implementation is O(N!)? Assuming the nested list [lesser] and [greater] are typos, wouldn't it be average O(3N logN) which would reduce to the expected average O(N logN)? Granted, the 3 list comps do unnecessary work.. – Chrispy Dec 28 '15 at 6:57
    
@Chrispy what if you sort a inverted order list, like 5,4,3,2,1 – Scott 混合理论 Dec 28 '15 at 10:08
    
@Scott混合理论 you are right that worst-case run time of quick sort is slow Θ(n^2), but according to "introduction to algorithm", the average-case running time is Θ(n lg n). And, more importantly, quick sort generally outperforms heap sort in practice – Lungang Fang Jun 5 at 6:24

If I search "python quicksort implementation" in Google, this question is the first result to pop up. I understand that the initial question was to "help correct the code" but there already are many answers that disregard that request: the currently second most voted one, the horrendous one-liner with the hilarious "You are fired" comment and, in general, many implementations that are not in-place (i.e. use extra memory proportional to input list size). This answer provides an in-place solution but it is for python 2.x. So, below follows my interpretation of the in-place solution from Rosetta Code which will work just fine for python 3 too:

import random

def qsort(l, fst, lst):
    if fst >= lst: return

    i, j = fst, lst
    pivot = l[random.randint(fst, lst)]

    while i <= j:
        while l[i] < pivot: i += 1
        while l[j] > pivot: j -= 1
        if i <= j:
            l[i], l[j] = l[j], l[i]
            i, j = i + 1, j - 1
    qsort(l, fst, j)
    qsort(l, i, lst)

And if you are willing to forgo the in-place property, below is yet another version which better illustrates the basic ideas behind quicksort. Apart from readability, its other advantage is that it is stable (equal elements appear in the sorted list in the same order that they used to have in the unsorted list). This stability property does not hold with the less memory-hungry in-place implementation presented above.

def qsort(l):
    if not l: return l # empty sequence case
    pivot = l[random.choice(range(0, len(l)))]

    head = qsort([elem for elem in l if elem < pivot])
    tail = qsort([elem for elem in l if elem > pivot])
    return head + [elem for elem in l if elem == pivot] + tail
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for sharing this solution. Can you please help us understand the time-complexity? I see that the recursion will call it 15 times. Of these 8 are valid calls to the function. Does that mean the time-complexity is O(n) for the first solution and space complexity is O(1) as its in-place sort ? – Tammy Oct 21 '15 at 11:46
    
@Tammy it looks like you misunderstand the big-O notation. Moreover, I do not really understand your question. Could you perhaps ask it as a separate one? Finally, Quicksort as an algorithm runs in O(n logn) time and O(n) space. – all3fox Oct 21 '15 at 17:43
2  
My Bad. Why on earth was i counting recursions ?? :-) Well, 15 recursions is [1 call (Level 0) + 2 call (Level 1 partition) + 4 call (Level 2 partition) + 8 call (Level 3 partition or Leaf nodes). So , we still have height as (lg8 + 1) = lgn. Total computation in each level is for c1(some cost) * n. Hence O(n lgn). Space complexity, for one in-place exchange = O(1). Hence for n elements = O(n). Thanks for the pointer. – Tammy Oct 21 '15 at 18:34

functional approach:

def qsort(list):
    if len(list) < 2:
        return list

    pivot = list.pop()
    left = filter(lambda x: x <= pivot, list)
    right = filter(lambda x: x > pivot, list)

    return qsort(left) + [pivot] + qsort(right)
share|improve this answer
def quick_sort(array):
    return quick_sort([x for x in array[1:] if x < array[0]]) + [array[0]] \
        + quick_sort([x for x in array[1:] if x >= array[0]]) if array else []
share|improve this answer
def Partition(A,p,q):
    i=p
    x=A[i]
    for j in range(p+1,q+1):
        if A[j]<=x:
            i=i+1
            tmp=A[j]
            A[j]=A[i]
            A[i]=tmp
    l=A[p]
    A[p]=A[i]
    A[i]=l
    return i

def quickSort(A,p,q):
    if p<q:
        r=Partition(A,p,q)
        quickSort(A,p,r-1)
        quickSort(A,r+1,q)
    return A
share|improve this answer
    
Please include explanation of what your code does and how it answers the question. Especially how does it relate to the code posted in the question. Answer should give the OP and future visitors guidance on how to debug and fix their problem. Pointing out, what the idea behind your code is, greatly helps in understanding the issue and applying or modifying your solution. Stack Overflow is not a code writing service, it’s a teaching and learning place. – Palec Mar 6 '15 at 8:47

I think both answers here works ok for the list provided (which answer the original question), but would breaks if an array containing non unique values is passed. So for completeness, I would just point out the small error in each and explain how to fix them.

For example trying to sort the following array [12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15,1] (Note that 1 appears twice) with Brionius algorithm .. at some point will end up with the less array empty and the equal array with a pair of values (1,1) that can not be separated in the next iteration and the len() > 1...hence you'll end up with an infinite loop

You can fix it by either returning array if less is empty or better by not calling sort in your equal array, as in zangw answer

def sort(array=[12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15]):
    less = []
    equal = []
    greater = []

    if len(array) > 1:
        pivot = array[0]
        for x in array:
            if x < pivot:
                less.append(x)
            if x == pivot:
                equal.append(x)
            if x > pivot:
                greater.append(x)

        # Don't forget to return something!
        return sort(less)+ equal +sort(greater)  # Just use the + operator to join lists
    # Note that you want equal ^^^^^ not pivot
    else:  # You need to hande the part at the end of the recursion - when you only have one element in your array, just return the array.
        return array

The fancier solution also breaks, but for a different cause, it is missing the return clause in the recursion line, which will cause at some point to return None and try to append it to a list ....

To fix it just add a return to that line

def qsort(arr): 
   if len(arr) <= 1:
      return arr
   else:
      return qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x<arr[0]]) + [arr[0]] + qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x>=arr[0]])
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, the concise version has less performance than the long one, since it is iterating the array twice to in the list comprehensions. – FedeN Feb 24 '14 at 12:48

Or if you prefer a one-liner that also illustrates the Python equivalent of C/C++ varags, lambda expressions, and if expressions:

qsort = lambda x=None, *xs: [] if x is None else qsort(*[a for a in xs if a<x]) + [x] + qsort(*[a for a in xs if a>=x])
share|improve this answer
13  
Lucas get in my office RIGHT NOW. What the hell is this line? B-b-b-b-but boss i-i-ts just a q-q-q-iucksort.... YOU'RE FIRED. Collect your stuff and GET OUT. – Anonymous Entity Jul 25 '14 at 7:27

functional programming aproach

smaller = lambda xs, y: filter(lambda x: x <= y, xs)
larger = lambda xs, y: filter(lambda x: x > y, xs)
qsort = lambda xs: qsort(smaller(xs[1:],xs[0])) + [xs[0]] + qsort(larger(xs[1:],xs[0])) if xs != [] else []

print qsort([3,1,4,2,5]) == [1,2,3,4,5]
share|improve this answer
def quick_sort(list):
    if len(list) ==0:
        return []

    return  quick_sort(filter( lambda item: item < list[0],list)) + [v for v in list if v==list[0] ]  +  quick_sort( filter( lambda item: item > list[0], list))
share|improve this answer
def quicksort(items):
    if not len(items) > 1:
        return items
    items, pivot = partition(items)
    return quicksort(items[:pivot]) + [items[pivot]] + quicksort(items[pivot + 1:])


def partition(items):
    i = 1
    pivot = 0
    for j in range(1, len(items)):
        if items[j] <= items[pivot]:
            items[i], items[j] = items[j], items[i]
            i += 1
    items[i - 1], items[pivot] = items[pivot], items[i - 1]
    return items, i - 1
share|improve this answer

inlace sort

def qsort(a, b=0, e=None):
    # partitioning
    def part(a, start, end):
        p = start
        for i in xrange(start+1, end):
            if a[i] < a[p]:
                a[i], a[p+1] = a[p+1], a[i]
                a[p+1], a[p] = a[p], a[p+1]
                p += 1
        return p

    if e is None:
        e = len(a)
    if e-b <= 1: return

    p = part(a, b, e)
    qsort(a, b, p)
    qsort(a, p+1, e)

without recursion:

deq = collections.deque()
deq.append((b, e))
while len(deq):
    el = deq.pop()
    if el[1] - el[0] > 1:
        p = part(a, el[0], el[1])
        deq.append((el[0], p))
        deq.append((p+1, el[1]))
share|improve this answer
    
please provide some explaination or background information instead of just the plain code – m02ph3u5 Sep 3 '15 at 10:14
    
It's pretty simple. We choose any element, first for example. And than divide list on two parts (left part with less than selected element and right is greater). Repeat this operation with left and right part and so on. – dimonb Sep 3 '15 at 10:20

Instead of taking three different arrays for less equal greater and then concatenating all try the traditional concept(partitioning method):

http://pythonplanet.blogspot.in/2015/08/quick-sort-using-traditional-partition.html

this is without using any inbuilt function.

partitioning function -

def partitn(alist, left, right):  
 i=left  
 j=right  
 mid=(left+right)/2   

pivot=alist[mid]  
while i <= j:  
    while alist[i] < pivot:  
        i=i+1   

    while alist[j] > pivot:  
        j=j-1   

    if i <= j:  
        temp = alist[i]  
        alist[i] = alist[j]  
        alist[j] = temp  
        i = i + 1   
        j = j - 1   
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. It's recommended that you include code in your answer, as links may become broken over time. – rnevius Sep 16 '15 at 12:11
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. In python, it is a good idiom to exchange objects without introducing a tepmorary name in one line like so: alist[i], alist[j] = alist[j], alist[i] – all3fox Oct 21 '15 at 17:48

A "true" in-place implementation [Algorithms 8.9, 8.11 from the Algorithm Design and Applications Book by Michael T. Goodrich and Roberto Tamassia]:

from random import randint

def partition (A, a, b):
    p = randint(a,b)
    # or mid point
    # p = (a + b) / 2

    piv = A[p]

    # swap the pivot with the end of the array
    A[p] = A[b]
    A[b] = piv

    i = a     # left index (right movement ->)
    j = b - 1 # right index (left movement <-)

    while i <= j:
        # move right if smaller/eq than/to piv
        while A[i] <= piv and i <= j:
            i += 1
        # move left if greater/eq than/to piv
        while A[j] >= piv and j >= i:
            j -= 1

        # indices stopped moving:
        if i < j:
            # swap
            t = A[i]
            A[i] = A[j]
            A[j] = t
    # place pivot back in the right place
    # all values < pivot are to its left and 
    # all values > pivot are to its right
    A[b] = A[i]
    A[i] = piv

    return i

def IpQuickSort (A, a, b):

    while a < b:
        p = partition(A, a, b) # p is pivot's location

        #sort the smaller partition
        if p - a < b - p:
            IpQuickSort(A,a,p-1)
            a = p + 1 # partition less than p is sorted
        else:
            IpQuickSort(A,p+1,b)
            b = p - 1 # partition greater than p is sorted


def main():
    A =  [12,3,5,4,7,3,1,3]
    print A
    IpQuickSort(A,0,len(A)-1)
    print A

if __name__ == "__main__": main()
share|improve this answer

I will do quicksort using numpy library. I think it is really usefull library. They already implemented the quick sort method but you can implment also your custom method.

import numpy
array = [3,4,8,1,2,13,28,11,99,76] #The array what we want to sort

indexes = numpy.argsort( array , None, 'quicksort', None)
index_list = list(indexes)

temp_array = []

for index in index_list:
    temp_array.append( array[index])

array = temp_array

print array #it will show sorted array
share|improve this answer
def quick_sort(l):
    if len(l) == 0:
        return l
    pivot = l[0]
    pivots = [x for x in l if x == pivot]
    smaller = quick_sort([x for x in l if x < pivot])
    larger = quick_sort([x for x in l if x > pivot])
    return smaller + pivots + larger
share|improve this answer
    
18 other answers, more than half of which answer OP's original question of "how to concatenate the three arrays". Does your answer add anything new? – Teepeemm Apr 19 at 1:21
  1. First we declare the first value in the array to be the pivot_value and we also set the left and right marks
  2. We create the first while loop, this while loop is there to tell the partition process to run again if it doesn't satisfy the necessary condition
  3. then we apply the partition process
  4. after both partition processes have ran, we check to see if it satisfies the proper condition. If it does, we mark it as done, if not we switch the left and right values and apply it again
  5. Once its done switch the left and right values and return the split_point

I am attaching the code below! This quicksort is a great learning tool because of the Location of the pivot value. Since it is in a constant place, you can walk through it multiple times and really get a hang of how it all works. In practice it is best to randomize the pivot to avoid O(N^2) runtime.

def quicksort10(alist):
    quicksort_helper10(alist, 0, len(alist)-1)

def quicksort_helper10(alist, first, last):
    """  """
    if first < last:
        split_point = partition10(alist, first, last)
        quicksort_helper10(alist, first, split_point - 1)
        quicksort_helper10(alist, split_point + 1, last)

def partition10(alist, first, last):
    done = False
    pivot_value = alist[first]
    leftmark = first + 1
    rightmark = last
    while not done:
        while leftmark <= rightmark and alist[leftmark] <= pivot_value:
            leftmark = leftmark + 1
        while leftmark <= rightmark and alist[rightmark] >= pivot_value:
            rightmark = rightmark - 1

        if leftmark > rightmark:
            done = True
        else:
            temp = alist[leftmark]
            alist[leftmark] = alist[rightmark]
            alist[rightmark] = temp
    temp = alist[first]
    alist[first] = alist[rightmark]
    alist[rightmark] = temp
    return rightmark
share|improve this answer

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