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I am totally new to python and I am trying to implement quick sort in it. Could someone please help me complete my code?

I do not know how to concatenate the three arrays and printing them.

def sort(array=[12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15]):
    less = []
    equal = []
    greater = []

    if len(array) > 1:
        pivot = array[0]
        for x in array:
            if x < pivot:
                less.append(x)
            if x == pivot:
                equal.append(x)
            if x > pivot:
                greater.append(x)
            sort(less)
            sort(pivot)
            sort(greater)
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1  
You can concatenate arrays by just adding: all = less + pivot + greater Or if you just want to print them: print less + pivot + greater –  kto Aug 15 '13 at 21:40
1  
pivot is a number, so it cannot be added to less. You need to wrap it in a list first. –  Bas Swinckels Aug 15 '13 at 21:49
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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted
def sort(array=[12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15]):
    less = []
    equal = []
    greater = []

    if len(array) > 1:
        pivot = array[0]
        for x in array:
            if x < pivot:
                less.append(x)
            if x == pivot:
                equal.append(x)
            if x > pivot:
                greater.append(x)
        # Don't forget to return something!
        return sort(less)+equal+sort(greater)  # Just use the + operator to join lists
    # Note that you want equal ^^^^^ not pivot
    else:  # You need to hande the part at the end of the recursion - when you only have one element in your array, just return the array.
        return array
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@user2687481 Could you either add that to this question, or write a new question? It's too hard to tell what your code says, since the comment box removes the formatting and whitespace. –  Brionius Aug 16 '13 at 4:55
    
Thank you for your help. I was able to figure out the problem. –  user2687481 Aug 16 '13 at 18:21
    
Very pythonic and easy to read. The answer by @zangw produced triplicates in my test. This is the best answer. –  Andrew Sledge May 1 at 16:37
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There is another concise and beautiful version

def qsort(arr): 
     if len(arr) <= 1:
          return arr
     else:
          return qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x<arr[0]]) + [arr[0]] + qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x>=arr[0]])
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I think both answers here works ok for the list provided (which answer the original question), but would breaks if an array containing non unique values is passed. So for completeness, I would just point out the small error in each and explain how to fix them.

For example trying to sort the following array [12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15,1] (Note that 1 appears twice) with Brionius algorithm .. at some point will end up with the less array empty and the equal array with a pair of values (1,1) that can not be separated in the next iteration and the len() > 1...hence you'll end up with an infinite loop

You can fix it by either returning array if less is empty or better by not calling sort in your equal array, as in zangw answer

def sort(array=[12,4,5,6,7,3,1,15]):
    less = []
    equal = []
    greater = []

    if len(array) > 1:
        pivot = array[0]
        for x in array:
            if x < pivot:
                less.append(x)
            if x == pivot:
                equal.append(x)
            if x > pivot:
                greater.append(x)

        # Don't forget to return something!
        return sort(less)+ equal +sort(greater)  # Just use the + operator to join lists
    # Note that you want equal ^^^^^ not pivot
    else:  # You need to hande the part at the end of the recursion - when you only have one element in your array, just return the array.
        return array

The fancier solution also breaks, but for a different cause, it is missing the return clause in the recursion line, which will cause at some point to return None and try to append it to a list ....

To fix it just add a return to that line

def qsort(arr): 
   if len(arr) <= 1:
      return arr
   else:
      return qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x<arr[0]]) + [arr[0]] + qsort([x for x in arr[1:] if x>=arr[0]])
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By the way, the concise version has less performance than the long one, since it is iterating the array twice to in the list comprehensions. –  FedeN Feb 24 at 12:48
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def quick_sort(list):
    if len(list) ==0:
        return []

    return  quick_sort(filter( lambda item: item < list[0],list)) + [v for v in list if v==list[0] ]  +  quick_sort( filter( lambda item: item > list[0], list))
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Or if you prefer a one-liner that also illustrates the Python equivalent of C/C++ varags, lambda expressions, and if expressions:

qsort = lambda x=None, *xs: [] if x is None else qsort(*[a for a in xs if a<x]) + [x] + qsort(*[a for a in xs if a>=x])
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functional approach:

def qsort(list):
    if len(list) <= 1:
        return list
    pivot = list[0]
    left = filter(lambda x: x <= pivot, list)
    right = filter(lambda x: x > pivot, list)
    return qsort(left) + (pivot,) + qsort(right)
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