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I am trying to get a fixed-width monospace font in gmail's new compose feature in firefox using a bit of css in userContent.css. Something like the following used to do the trick for me:

@-moz-document domain(mail.google.com)
{
  .ii, .Ak, .editable, .LW-avf
  {
    font-family: monospace !important;
    font-size: 100% !important;
  }
}

but it no longer works. Using the inspect element in firefox I see that the message is in something like:

<body id=":di" class="editable LW-avf"

Is there something I am missing here? Why is a compose window not monospace if it is in class editable and LW-avf?

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3 Answers 3

I guessed that the iframe will not have any domain associated with it. This seems to work for viewing and composing messages:

@-moz-document domain(mail.google.com) {
    .gs .ii {
        font-family: monospace !important;
        font-size: 100% !important;
    }
}
@-moz-document domain() {
    .editable.LW-avf {
        font-family: monospace !important;
        font-size: 100% !important;
    }
}
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Yes, but won't this apply a monospace font to ANY web page that has a class named .editable? –  idfah Oct 26 '13 at 2:27
1  
I tested this and the style is only applied to pages that don't have a domain. The iframe is one such case, local pages (file://) is another. If you remove "@-moz-document domain()" completely, then the style will apply everywhere. –  VokinLoksar Oct 26 '13 at 12:07
    
Ah, I see, clever. Still not perfect, but better than what I had! –  idfah Oct 27 '13 at 1:39

Interesting, but can't check the specifics as I dropped GMail some time ago (google was getting too freaky with pushing social networking...)

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/cascade.html#used-value

On the cascade order it says that Author mode trumps user mode. Unless user !important. Which you are using.

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/cascade.html#specificity

And here it says that the more specific gets applied.

for example:

div#d.bclass { color: green; }
.aclass { color: red; }

<div id=d class="aclass bclass">hello world</div>

The div will be green all day long. But I bet you already know that.

What may be happening, is that the browser is choosing some author rule that has much more specificity than yours. which is a bug...Can you look at the Inspector and see where the computed font comes from?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After taking a closer look at the gmail html, it looks like they are using an iframe with the html explicitly embedded... I have never seen this before. Something like:

<html>
  <body>
    <iframe>
      #document
        <!DOCTYPE html>
          <html>
            <body id=":di" class="editable LW-avf">
              ...
            </body>
          </html>
    </iframe>
  </body>
</html>

Presumably, the @-moz-document domain(mail.google.com) doesn't match the url for the page in the iframe (not sure what the URL would even be).

If I don't match the url then it works fine. Of course, now the style will be applied to any page with a class named editable.

I may take this up with the mozilla developers when I find time.

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