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I have an application that has a handful of states that all share a single UI. The thing is, depending on the application state, the components of the UI will be doing very different things.

In one state, mousing over a component might bring up a tooltip, in another it might serve as a way to 'add to a list,' or some such behavior.

For now, I have a single UI class with many component subclasses. The UI passes a callback to the components, which they might call when interacted with. As of now, their behavior is dictated by a simple switch statement in the UI that checks state and returns behavior, but this seems to risk increasing the complexity unnecessarily.

The solutions I've thought of are to have a different UI class per state, with behaviors appropriate for that state included in its methods. Another is to simply have a 'dictionary' of methods in the UI, where a method could be called like

doSomething[currentState]()

The problem with that is that I would have to create identical methods in the UI for every single state.

The final solution is to simply have a UI with no logic processed on its own. All component's of the UI are given callbacks from the 'state manager,' which then in turn has knowledge of the UI's methods to call upon.

What is the best way to go about this?

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1 Answer 1

An application usually consists of some modules, and each module should have dependent components.

In you case, each state should be different module. "In one state, mousing over a component might bring up a tooltip, in another it might serve as a way to 'add to a list,' or some such behavior.", so the behavior could be implemented in each module, and the modules have the component(by extends base class or composition , or other way).

This could make the code cleared, and you can replace the module easier, but more classes.

And I think using state to decide behavior should be used in a very low-level code piece and in one module.

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