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I'm trying to figure out how to do this in Scala

I have a

List( MyObject(id, name, status), ..., MyObject(id, name, status) )

and I want to apply a function to this collection in order to obtain a List containing all the "id" properties of MyObjects

List( id1, id2, .., idN)

I'd like something similar to Ruby's inject method:

list.inject( [] ){ |lst, el| lst << el }

Any suggestion?

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1  
inject is closest to foldLeft, but using inject with a list accumulator like that is a map so you might as well use that. –  Mysterious Dan Aug 16 '13 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use List's (actually, TraversableLike's) map function, as follows: list.map(_.id). There are a wealth of useful methods like this available to the Scala collection classes - well worth learning.

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Using list.map(_.id) is the best solution in this case. Obviously, there are many other ways to do it. To put it into perspective, following are two examples.

Injecting into an array

Adding selected elements into an array, e.g.:

    > list = [1,2,3]
     => [1,2,3]
    > list.inject([]) { |list,el| list << "Element #{el}"  if (el % 2 == 0); list }
     => ["Element 2"] 

might be implemented in Scala as:

    > val list = List(1,2,3)
    list: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)
    > val map = list.map(x => if (x % 2 == 0) Some(s"Element $x") else None).flatten
    map: List[String] = List(Element 2)

Injecting into a hash

Following Ruby code injecting into a hash:

    > list = [1,2,3]
     => [1,2,3]
    > list.inject({}) { |memo,x| memo[x] = "Element #{x}"; memo }
     => {1=>"Element 1", 2=>"Element 2", 3=>"Element 3"} 

could be done in Scala as:

    > val list = List(1,2,3)
    list: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)
    > val map = list.map(x => (x -> s"Element $x")).toMap
    map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,String] = Map(1 -> Element 1, 2 -> Element 2, 3 -> Element 3)
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