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I'm writing a state machine based python program that currently prints to the console the state of the machines. This is useful as a log, but not the most user friendly interface.

I'm interested to know if there are good examples of using ncurses in Python, preferably something in OOP that presents changing information (eg: state information) in a table.

The have already tried the curses package in python, however it is not as OO as I want.

This is what the stream currently looks like:

manager:    st_machine_01    state INITIALISE
manager:    st_machine_01    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_02    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_03    state INITIALISE
manager:    st_machine_03    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_04    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_05    state INITIALISE
manager:    st_machine_05    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_01    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_05    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_05    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_01    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_06    state INITIALISE
manager:    st_machine_06    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_01    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_06    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_01    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_06    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_07    state INITIALISE
manager:    st_machine_07    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_06    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_06    state EXIT

Whereas a ncurses "table" rendered at the last point of the above stream would look something like:

manager:    st_machine_01    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_02    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_03    state GET_LIST_PAGES
manager:    st_machine_04    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_05    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_06    state EXIT
manager:    st_machine_07    state GET_LIST_PAGES

I'm seeking to do this on Python 2.7 64bit, Windows 7 64bit.

share|improve this question
    
that looks pretty good when the machines are in order. If you limit the display to just 7 lines and a status or cmd line, you can flash the screen brifly when ever a state changes. If you reprint the new states quickly it will look pretty cool. you could add a log entry to the last line, st_machine_05 changed to Get_List_Pages from state Exit... – Dru Aug 16 '13 at 3:24

You can use the standard curses module. You can find its documentation here.

share|improve this answer
    
The curses package is not as complete as I wanted. – dilbert Aug 16 '13 at 2:03
    
Can you add that extra condition to your question? Thanks. – Mario Rossi Aug 16 '13 at 2:05

If curses is not enough (for some undescribed reason), pycdk or urwid could be better suited to your needs.

share|improve this answer

.

The ncurses package is not very OO but, you will definitely benefit from using an OO approach to using it.

class screen {
  class rectangle {
    class line { 
      string default_text="please enter a command (press 'e' to list available events) >> ";
    }
  }
}

sm_window = new screen("sc1").new rectangle( "log_rect", lines=7 );
log_rect.line[7] = "st_machine_05 changed to Get_List_Pages from state Exit";

If you keep all your accesses to the ncurses package in these few classes you'll be farther along than if you pepper ncurses calls all over your existing app.

If you haven't made all your fields private for some reason, you can access all the required program data right from the screen class.

share|improve this answer
    
I have used ncurses in Python previously, and as you say, it was "peppered" with ncurses calls everywhere, hence why I want to go OO and hopefully get something that is event-driven (like a GUI framework). – dilbert Aug 16 '13 at 4:41
1  
I was thinking of learning some python and thought I would offer you some help, – Dru Aug 16 '13 at 4:50

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