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on http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-hybi-thewebsocketprotocol-17 described the websocket protocol.about Sec-WebSocket-Key it says

For this header field, the server has to take the value (as present
in the header field, e.g. the base64-encoded [RFC4648] version minus
any leading and trailing whitespace), and concatenate this with the
Globally Unique Identifier (GUID, [RFC4122]) "258EAFA5-E914-47DA-
95CA-C5AB0DC85B11" in string form, which is unlikely to be used by
network endpoints that do not understand the WebSocket protocol. A
SHA-1 hash (160 bits), base64-encoded (see Section 4 of [RFC4648]),
of this concatenation is then returned in the server's handshake
[FIPS.180-2.2002].

here's the thing i can't understand: why not simply return code 101?if the proper of Sec-WebSocket-Key is for security or to prove they can handle websocket request,any server can return the expected key if they want, and pretend they are a websocket server.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to RFC 6455 Websocket standard

first part:

.. the server has to prove to the client that it received the
client's WebSocket handshake, so that the server doesn't accept
connections that are not WebSocket connections.  This prevents an
attacker from tricking a WebSocket server by sending it carefully
crafted packets using XMLHttpRequest [XMLHttpRequest] or a form
submission.

...
For this header field, the server has to take the value (as present
in the header field, e.g., the base64-encoded [RFC4648] version minus
any leading and trailing whitespace) and concatenate this with the
Globally Unique Identifier (GUID, [RFC4122]) "258EAFA5-E914-47DA-
95CA-C5AB0DC85B11" in string form, which is unlikely to be used by
network endpoints that do not understand the WebSocket Protocol.

second part:

The |Sec-WebSocket-Key| header field is used in the WebSocket opening
handshake.  It is sent from the client to the server to provide part
of the information used by the server to prove that it received a
valid WebSocket opening handshake.  This helps ensure that the server
does not accept connections from non-WebSocket clients (e.g., HTTP
clients) that are being abused to send data to unsuspecting WebSocket
servers.

So, as the value of the GUID is specified in the standard, it is unlikely (possible, put with very small probability) that the server which is not aware of Websockets will use it. It does not provide any security (secure websockets - wss:// - does), it just ensures that server understands websockets protocol.

Really, as you've mentioned, if you are aware of websockets (that's what to be checked), you could pretend to be a websocket server by sending correct response. But then, if you will not act correctly (e.g. form frames correctly), it will be considered as a protocol violation. Actually, you can write a websocket server that is incorrect, but there will be not much use in it.

And another purpose is to prevent clients accidentally requesting websockets upgrade not expecting it (say, by adding corresponding headers manually and then expecting smth else). Sec-WebSocket-Key and other related headers are prohibited to be set using setRequestHeader method in browsers.

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it's true some request header fields can't be modified from javascript in XMLHttpRequest,so the way from browser is blocked? but what if there is a browser(maybe an early version) that can allow modify the Sec-websocket-key field?or if the request are send by a program to simulate a browser, you can totally build the request header by yourself,thus made Sec-WebSocket-Key non-sense? –  user2003548 Aug 16 '13 at 12:03
    
Please, re-read my answer. Even if you write your server or client that will emulate the correct upgrade request, you would do it intentionally with the knowledge that Websockest protocol exists. The Sec-WebSocket-Key is used to filter unintended requests. If you bother about security - use secure websockets. –  Pavel K Aug 16 '13 at 12:37
    
so the protocol is designed based on ppl would use it normally,if face a malicious software writer it would be screw up like normal http, do i get it right? –  user2003548 Aug 17 '13 at 7:44
    
Definitely, you can break normal flow of the protocol if you know how it work. And exactly for that purpose (if you like to be sure everything is under your control) cryptography and secure protocols were proposed. The idea is to separate data transfer in certain format (for that HTTP and Websocket protocols are responsible) and security (SSL/TLS in role here), because latest adds some performance overhead that might be unnecessary. And secure data transfer is provided combining those - and named HTTPS/WSS. –  Pavel K Aug 17 '13 at 9:43
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