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I am just learning some details about html5 canvas, and in the progress, I am trying to build a simple color wheel by wedges (build a 1 degree wedge at a time and add it up to 360 degree). However, I am getting some weird marks on the gradient as shown in the following image:

wierd color marks.

Here is the fiddle that produced the colorwheel: http://jsfiddle.net/53JBM/

In particular, this is the JS code:

var canvas = document.getElementById("picker");
var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
var x = canvas.width / 2;
var y = canvas.height / 2;
var radius = 100;
var counterClockwise = false;

for(var angle=0; angle<=360; angle+=1){
    var startAngle = (angle-1)*Math.PI/180;
    var endAngle = angle * Math.PI/180;
    context.beginPath();
    context.moveTo(x, y);
    context.arc(x, y, radius, startAngle, endAngle, counterClockwise);
    context.closePath();
    context.fillStyle = 'hsl('+angle+', 100%, 50%)';
    context.fill();
}

If anyone can point out what I am doing wrong or if there is a better way to accomplish what I am attempting to do it would be much appreciated :)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Is this enough to you, please check

var startAngle = (angle-2)*Math.PI/180;
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Do you have any idea why this works and -1 doesn't? I would love to know the underlying reason. –  FurtiveFelon Aug 16 '13 at 4:37
1  
This seems to work –  Markasoftware Aug 16 '13 at 4:38
    
Your drawing arc. right? Check your co-ordinates of arcs. –  Pandiyan Cool Aug 16 '13 at 4:46
    
Actually you have to do like this var startAngle = (angle-1)*Math.PI/180; var endAngle = (angle+1) * Math.PI/180; –  Pandiyan Cool Aug 16 '13 at 4:47
    
I am not too sure what you mean by co-ordinates of arcs, what i want is for it to sweep 1 degree wedge, and paint many such wedges right? It seems what you are doing is to have 2 degrees per wedge and covering up half of current one with the next one. My understanding is probably not correct at all, if you could enlighten me where I am going wrong it would be much appreciated :) –  FurtiveFelon Aug 16 '13 at 5:24
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