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I tried the following code

public class HelloWorld {

    public void printData(Test t) {
        System.out.println("Reached 1");
    }

    public void printData(newTest t) {
        System.out.println("Reached 2");
    }

    public void printData(newTest1 t) {
        System.out.println("Reached 3");
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Test t1 = new Test();
        HelloWorld h = new HelloWorld();
        h.printData(t1);

        NewTest t2 = new NewTest();
        h.printData(t2);

        NewTest1 t3 = new NewTest1();
        h.printData(t3);

        Test t4 = new NewTest();
        h.printData(t4);

        Test t5 = new NewTest1();
        h.printData(t5);
    }
}

and I have simple classes

class Test {
}

class NewTest extends Test {
}

class NewTest1 extends Test {
}

and the output I got is

Reached 1
Reached 2
Reached 3
Reached 1
Reached 1

From the output it looks like when jvm decides which function to execute it takes into consideration only the type of reference and not the actual type of the object.

Why does this happen? Why can't jvm take into consideration the type of actual object rather than the type of the reference pointing to it?

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marked as duplicate by Matt Ball, Jayan, Sayem Ahmed, Luiggi Mendoza, Stephen C Aug 16 '13 at 5:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Re: "when jvm decides which function to execute it takes into consideration only the type of reference and not the actual type of the object": It would be more accurate to say that the compiler does not defer the decision to the JVM, so it's not the JVM making this decision. (It should be obvious, given this fact, why only the static type of the expression, and not the runtime-type of its value, is taken into account.) –  ruakh Aug 16 '13 at 4:51
    
Also, it's not totally clear to me what you're asking when you ask "why". Are you asking for a link to the part of the Java Language Specification that specifies this? Are you asking for an explanation of why the language was designed this way? Are you just rhetorically asking "why"? :-P –  ruakh Aug 16 '13 at 4:52
    
Classname should always start with CAPS, newTest and newTest1 does not follow coding conventions. –  Sachin Thapa Aug 16 '13 at 4:53

1 Answer 1

Function overloading is compile time polymorphism and here the compiler decide which version of the method will called.For the compiler it's very difficult to know the actual object for run time so it check the reference type only irrespective of the object it's going to point.

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2  
This explanation doesn't make sense. "For the compiler it's very difficult to know the actual object for run time ...". Actually, it would be impossible for the compiler to know this. But it could be handled by the Java runtime system. And indeed, in some other languages it probably is handled at runtime. –  Stephen C Aug 16 '13 at 5:07
    
Yes we can say impossible , but with some high logic it may be possible to know the actual object(not sure how), I believe on the concept of nothing is impossible. –  Krushna Aug 16 '13 at 5:10
    
"High logic" would not be sufficient. The Java compiler cannot make deductions that involve the behaviour of classes that haven't been written yet. –  Stephen C Aug 16 '13 at 6:39

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