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I'm given the following FSM description :

The daily parking permit cost $20. Each pay station has a single slot, which accepts various bills. A subcontractor provides a bill sensor, which outputs a 3-bit vector named Input. The Input vector is “100” if $5 is inserted, “010” if $10 bill is inserted, “111” if $20 bill is inserted and “001” if no bill is inserted.

We dispense the permit (Permit = ’1′) when $20 is collected and produce change (if needed) by outputting Rest (Rest = ’1′).

So I'm in the process of creating a FSM and I came up with the following (sorry for the weird Visio design, first time using it): enter image description here

I also checked if there was any state minimization possible and I determined that while state 1,2,3 have the same output, "Input", values, they don't output to the same states which means those three states cannot be minimized and that this would be my final FSM that describes this English description. Would this be a correct FSM?

Also, if I wanted to describe the the 5 states would the best way to do so be a 3 bit encoding?

EDIT: There should be a Input=100 from State 2 to State 3 (not depicted)

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1 Answer 1

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How many states you need depends on what kind of FSM you want to make. Common types of machines are Mealy machines and Moore machines. (At least, those are the ones I specifically remember from my college days.)

Mealy Machine

A Mealy machine has an action associated with every combination of state and input. The action is executed when the input is received, and then the machine moves to a new (or possibly the same) state. The machine is specified by a state transition table, which lists the action and next state for every possible combination of current state and input.

You can make a 4-state Mealy machine that meets your specifications. Here are states:

State   Meaning
    0   $0 balance
    5   $5 balance
   10   $10 balance
   15   $15 balance

Note that I have labelled the states in a way that makes it easy to remember what each state means. Here's the transition table:

State   Input     Next State   Action
    0   no bill            0   (no action)
    0   $5                 5   (no action)
    0   $10               10   (no action)
    0   $20                0   emit permit
    5   no bill            5   (no action)
    5   $5                10   (no action)
    5   $10               15   (no action)
    5   $20                0   emit permit and $5
   10   no bill           10   (no action)
   10   $5                15   (no action)
   10   $10                0   emit permit
   10   $20                0   emit permit and $10
   15   no bill           15   (no action)
   15   $5                 0   emit permit
   15   $10                0   emit permit and $5
   15   $20                0   emit permit and $15

Moore Machine

A Moore machine has an action associated with each state, and the action is always executed when the state is entered. When the machine receives input, it transitions to a new state, and executes that state's entry action - even if it is simply re-entering the same state. Thus the machine is specified by two tables. The entry action table specifies the action to take for each state when the state is entered. The state transition table specifies the state to which the machine goes for every possible combination of current state and input.

For your requirements, you need an 8-state Moore machine. Here's the entry action table:

State   Meaning              Entry Action
    0   $0 total inserted    (no action)
    5   $5 total inserted    (no action)
   10   $10 total inserted   (no action)
   15   $15 total inserted   (no action)
   20   $20 total inserted   emit permit
   25   $25 total inserted   emit permit and $5
   30   $30 total inserted   emit permit and $10
   35   $35 total inserted   emit permit and $15

Note that the meaning describes the state of the machine before executing the entry action. For states 20, 25, 30, and 35, after executing the action, the machine has no pending balance, because it has emitted everything necessary to get the balance back to zero. Thus, aside from the entry actions, states 20, 25, 30, and 35 are equivalent to state 0 and should have the same input transitions as state 0.

Here's the transition table:

State   Input     Next State
    0   no bill            0
    0   $5                 5
    0   $10               10
    0   $20               20
    5   no bill            5
    5   $5                10
    5   $10               15
    5   $20               25
   10   no bill           10
   10   $5                15
   10   $10               20
   10   $20               30
   15   no bill           15
   15   $5                20
   15   $10               25
   15   $20               35
   20   no bill            0
   20   $5                 5
   20   $10               10
   20   $20               20
   25   no bill            0
   25   $5                 5
   25   $10               10
   25   $20               20
   30   no bill            0
   30   $5                 5
   30   $10               10
   30   $20               20
   35   no bill            0
   35   $5                 5
   35   $10               10
   35   $20               20

Note that if you allow an entry action to also change the state of the machine, you can eliminate half of the state transition table. Simply append “and go to state 0” to the action for states 20, 25, 30, and 35.

Encoding the States in 3 Bits

The most obvious way to encode the states in three bits, for either of the machines I described, is simply to divide the state number by 5. That gives a number in the range 0…3 for the Mealy machine, which fits in two bits, and a number in the range 0…7 for the Moore machine, which fits in three bits.

If you were to assign the inputs from the bill reader differently, and use the simple state encoding I just described, then each machine could use one rule to describe all of its state transitions. (Each machine uses a different rule.) Suppose the inputs were assigned like this:

000   no bill
001   $5
010   $10
100   $20

Then, for the Mealy machine, the next state rule is this:

if currentState + input >= 20:
    nextState = 0
else:
    nextState = currentState + input

And for the Moore machine, the next state rule is this:

if currentState >= 20:
    nextState = input
else:
    nextState = currentState + input
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You said the encoding for the mealy machine can be represented in 2 bits. How is that? So if you have 0,5,10,15,20 then what would the 2 bit representations be? 00, 00, 01, 10, 11? Could I use 3 bits as 000,001,010,011,100 to represent those 5 states? –  user1766888 Aug 16 '13 at 6:58
    
There is no state 20 in the Mealy machine. The Mealy machine never has a persistent balance of $20. When an input takes the balance to $20 or more, the input action brings the balance (and thus the state) back to 0. –  rob mayoff Aug 16 '13 at 7:01

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