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I'm looking for a way to track how long it took for a page to be generated by the server. I know I can use Trace to track this but I need a way to display this per page.

Its ASP.Net MVC 2

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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Yep the Derin Suggestion is the standard Way to do it in an ASP.NEt application, i would just suggest add an if so it does not interfere with non-HTML responses: EDIT: added complete implementation

public class PerformanceMonitorModule : IHttpModule
{

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        context.PreRequestHandlerExecute += delegate(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Set Page Timer Star
            HttpContext requestContext = ((HttpApplication)sender).Context;
            Stopwatch timer = new Stopwatch();
            requestContext.Items["Timer"] = timer;
            timer.Start();
             };
        context.PostRequestHandlerExecute += delegate(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            HttpContext httpContext = ((HttpApplication)sender).Context;
            HttpResponse response = httpContext.Response;
            Stopwatch timer = (Stopwatch)httpContext.Items["Timer"];
            timer.Stop();

            // Don't interfere with non-HTML responses
            if (response.ContentType == "text/html")
            {
                double seconds = (double)timer.ElapsedTicks / Stopwatch.Frequency;
                string result_time = string.Format("{0:F4} sec ", seconds);
                RenderQueriesToResponse(response,result_time);
            }
        };
    }
    void RenderQueriesToResponse(HttpResponse response, string result_time)
    {
        response.Write("<div style=\"margin: 5px; background-color: #FFFF00\"");
        response.Write(string.Format("<b>Page Generated in "+ result_time));
        response.Write("</div>");
    }
    public void Dispose() { /* Not needed */ }
}

you can also add some style to it...

And remember to register your Module in WebConfig inside httpModules Section:

  <add name="Name" type="namespace, dll"/>

For a Complete Reference about this check the Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework by Steven Sanderson - Chapter 15 - Performance, Monitoring Page Generation Times.

EDIT:(comment @Pino) Here is the example for my project: alt text

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Thanks - works well except This seems to output AFTER the </html> element which breaks my page :( suggestions? –  LiamB Dec 1 '09 at 15:46
    
This is added (append) as part of the response, it may not be after the HTML closing tag. –  JOBG Dec 1 '09 at 15:58
    
I edit my post with a sample img, i already have a project running and test it, i don't know why Darin said its after the HTML..?, maybe he referred to another implementation. –  JOBG Dec 1 '09 at 16:10
    
Can you post full example? the code at the moment is displaying below the </html> tag. –  LiamB Dec 2 '09 at 8:10
    
Fantastic - this works well. –  LiamB Dec 2 '09 at 8:24
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You can implement it like a ActionFilterAttribute

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class LoggingAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private readonly Stopwatch _sw;

    public LoggingAttribute()
    {
        _sw = new Stopwatch();
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        _sw.Start();
        Debug.WriteLine("Beginning executing: " + GetControllerAndActionName(filterContext.ActionDescriptor));
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        _sw.Stop();
        var ms = _sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

        Debug.WriteLine("Finishing executing: " + GetControllerAndActionName(filterContext.ActionDescriptor));
        Debug.WriteLine("Time elapsed: "+ TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(ms).TotalSeconds);
    }

    private string GetControllerAndActionName(ActionDescriptor actionDescriptor)
    {
        return actionDescriptor.ControllerDescriptor.ControllerName + " - " + actionDescriptor.ActionName;
    }
}

Decorate every controller or action-method with it and voila, it spit outs the text in debug.

EDIT: If you want to print it on the page you could add this snippet to the OnActionExecuted method

if(filterContext.Result is ViewResult) { //Make sure the request is a ViewResult, ie. a page
  ((ViewResult) filterContext.Result).ViewData["ExecutionTime"] = ms; //Set the viewdata dictionary
}

Now you have the executiontime saved in ViewData and can access it in the page.. I usually put it in the masterpage like this

<!-- The page took <%= ViewData["ExecutionTime"] %> ms to execute -->
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Decorate every controller or action-method is a bit of a pain as we have a lot (Pretty big project) - anyway we can make this work site wide without making such a large change? –  LiamB Dec 1 '09 at 15:50
3  
In my projeect all my controllers inherits from a BaseController. So I just decorate the basecontroller, which in turn "decorates" all action-methods being executed. –  Kenny Eliasson Dec 1 '09 at 15:53
2  
Its Pretty good approach, its just worth mentioning that this actually track the Controller life time, and not the total Request life time. –  JOBG Dec 1 '09 at 16:50
    
@Omar, from my understanding a Request begins when an Action is "Executing" and ends when an Action is "Executed". What would be the request life time otherwise? –  Omar Dec 2 '09 at 2:01
1  
@Pino - With ASP.NET MVC3 you can add the attribute to the GlobalFiltersCollection during the Application_Start handler to avoid decorating every class/action with it. –  Justin Rusbatch Apr 11 '11 at 21:47
show 4 more comments

It will depend on where you want to include this information. For example you could write an http handler that will display the render time after the </html> tag:

public class RenderTimeModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        context.BeginRequest += (sender, e) =>
        {
            var watch = new Stopwatch();
            var app = (HttpApplication)sender;
            app.Context.Items["Stopwatch"] = watch;
            watch.Start();
        };

        context.EndRequest += (sender, e) =>
        {
            var app = (HttpApplication)sender;
            var watch = (Stopwatch)app.Context.Items["Stopwatch"];
            watch.Stop();
            var ts = watch.Elapsed;
            string elapsedTime = String.Format("{0} ms", ts.TotalMilliseconds);
            app.Context.Response.Write(elapsedTime);
        };
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

If you want to display render time somewhere in the middle of the html page then this render time will not account for the total page render time.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to output AFTER the </html> element which breaks my page :( suggestions? –  LiamB Dec 1 '09 at 15:45
    
Yes, that's what I said in my post. You could put it in a comment if you don't want to break your validation. –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 1 '09 at 16:45
    
Will this approach work with Json and File results or just html? –  Jace Rhea Dec 1 '09 at 17:21
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