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I want to create template< typename F > using T = boost::variant< F, F const >; type to store read-only and read-write accessible values into the same std::vector< T >. But I've got the following programming problem:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

#include <boost/variant.hpp>

int main()
{
    using F = double;
    using CV = boost::variant< F const, F >;
    F const c = 0.0;
    CV C(c);
    F v = 0.0;
    CV V(v);
    std::cout << C.which() << ' ' << V.which() << std::endl; 
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Output: 1 1. How can I store the const version of the value of type F?

share|improve this question
    
first of all you'd better to understand why... then look for solution. I'm digging a little into guts of boost::variant and discover that to initialize that different variants correct initializer called (i.e. const and non-const), but it returns invalid index for const parameter. index is a part of initializer type, which is obviously have some bug (or maybe feature)... so you'd better to dig into boost::detail::variant::make_initializer_node guts for answer (it is around line 111 of boost/variant/detail/initializer.hpp) –  zaufi Aug 16 '13 at 7:15
    
@zaufi I will try. But it is seems too hard to understand. –  Orient Aug 16 '13 at 8:39
    
reading (and understanding) code written by others is a very helpful skill anyway... use your chance to develop it! :)) –  zaufi Aug 16 '13 at 8:50

1 Answer 1

This is not the solution, but something usefull:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <cstdlib>

#include <boost/variant.hpp>

int main()
{
    using F = double;
    using CV = boost::variant< std::reference_wrapper< F const >, std::reference_wrapper< F > >;
    F const c = 0.0;
    CV C(std::ref(c));
    F v = 0.0;
    CV V(std::ref(v));
    std::cout << C.which() << ' ' << V.which() << std::endl; 
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

This requires an additional space to store the data if any. In some cases, it may be more appropriate than one in the original formulation of the question.

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