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I have built this code to process string comparison between large number of strings in parallel to go faster.

I've used a ConcurrentBag so all the threads (tasks) can write to a thread safe collection. Then I dump this collection to a file.

The issue I have is that the ConcurrentBag<string> log that I dump to a file is filled faster than it can write to the file. So my program consumes more and more ram continuously until it runs out of memory.

My question is what can I do ? Improve the writing to the log ? Pause the tasks until the ConcurrentBag is dumped then resume the tasks ? What would be the fastest option ?

Here is the code :

CsvWriter csv = new CsvWriter(@"C:\test.csv");

List<Bailleur> bailleurs = DataLoader.LoadBailleurs();
ConcurrentBag<string> log = new ConcurrentBag<string>();
int i = 0;

var taskWriteToLog = new Task(() =>
{
    // Consume the items in the bag
    string item;
    while (true)  //  (!log.IsEmpty)
    {
        if (!log.IsEmpty)
        {
            if (log.TryTake(out item))
            {
                csv.WriteLine(item);
            }
            else
                Console.WriteLine("Concurrent Bag busy");
        }
        else
        {
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
    }
});

taskWriteToLog.Start();

Parallel.ForEach(bailleurs, s1 =>
{
    foreach (Bailleur s2 in bailleurs)
    {
        var lcs2 = LongestCommonSubsequenceExtensions.LongestCommonSubsequence(s1.Name, s2.Name);
        string line = String.Format("\"LCS\",\"{0}\",\"{1}\",\"{2}\"", s1.Name, s2.Name, lcs2.Item2);
        log.Add(line);
        // Console.WriteLine(line);

        var dic = DiceCoefficientExtensions.DiceCoefficient(s1.Name, s2.Name);
        line = String.Format("\"DICE\",\"{0}\",\"{1}\",\"{2}\"", s1.Name, s2.Name, dic);
        log.Add(line);
        // Console.WriteLine(line);
    }
    i++;
    Console.WriteLine(i);
});

public class CsvWriter
{
    public string FilePath { get; set; }
    private FileStream _fs { get; set; }
    private StreamWriter _sw { get; set; }

    public CsvWriter2(string filePath)
    {
        FilePath = filePath;
        _fs = new FileStream(FilePath, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);
        _sw = new StreamWriter(_fs);
    }

    public void WriteLine(string line)
    {
        _sw.WriteLine(line);
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use the concurrent bag directly, use a BlockingCollection that has the concurrent bag as the backing store (by default it is a concurrent queue).

One of the constructor overloads lets you set a upper limit on the size of the collection, if the bag gets full it will block the inserting thread untill there is room to insert.

It also gives you the GetConsumingEnumerable() that makes it very easy to take items out of the bag, you just use that in a foreach loop and it will keep giving your consumer data till CompleteAdding is called. After that it runs till the bag is empty then exits like any other normal IEnumerable that has completed. If the bag "goes dry" before CompleteAdding is called it will block the thread and automatically restart when more data is put in to the bag.

void ProcessLog()
{
    CsvWriter csv = new CsvWriter(@"C:\test.csv");

    List<Bailleur> bailleurs = DataLoader.LoadBailleurs();

    const int MAX_BAG_SIZE = 500;
    BlockingCollection<string> log = new BlockingCollection<string>(new ConcurrentBag<string>(), MAX_BAG_SIZE);

    int i = 0;

    var taskWriteToLog = new Task(() =>
    {
        // Consume the items in the bag, no need for sleeps or poleing, When items are available it runs, when the bag is empty but CompletedAdding has not been called it blocks.
        foreach(string item in log.GetConsumingEnumerable())
        {
            csv.WriteLine(item);
        }
    });

    taskWriteToLog.Start();

    Parallel.ForEach(bailleurs, s1 =>
    {
        //Snip... You can switch to BlockingCollection without any changes to this section of code.
    });

    log.CompleteAdding(); //lets anyone using GetConsumingEnumerable know that no new items are comming so they can leave the foreach loops when the bag becomes empty.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome ! It works really nice ! thanks a lot –  Arno 2501 Aug 16 '13 at 7:14
    
@Arno2501 know this class is also very useful when you need to go in the reverse direction, one writer in to the bag, many threads all calling GetConsumingEnumberable() to do work as it becomes available. Parallel.ForEach(myBlockingCollection.GetConsumingEnumberable(), ...) works quite well, I use it a lot in projects where I use a IDataReader that can only be accessed by one thread but the work from it's result can be processed in parallel. –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 16 '13 at 7:23
    
Very useful information thanks again. Awesome to see that parallel processing is getting easier :-) –  Arno 2501 Aug 16 '13 at 7:25
    
I don't see any reason to use ConcurrentBag here. I think BlockingCollection backed by the default ConcurrentQueue is likely going to be slightly faster –  svick Aug 16 '13 at 11:44
1  
@ScottChamberlain “ConcurrentBag<T> is […] optimized for scenarios where the same thread will be both producing and consuming data stored in the bag.” That's not the case here, so I would stick with the default. But I haven't benchmarked it either. –  svick Aug 16 '13 at 17:28

Use BlockingCollection instead of ConcurrentBag

BlockingCollection<string> log = new BlockingCollection<string>();
var item = log.Take();

In this case Take will be blocked until an item is inserted and you will not have to check log.IsEmpty. There will be also no need for Thread.Sleep

while (true)
{
    var item = log.Take();
    //Do something with item......
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't even bother with Take and while(true) use a foreach loop and GetConsumingEnumerable() –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 16 '13 at 7:07
    
The problem here seems to be that the collection is filling too fast, not too slow. BlockingCollection can help you with that too, but you need to explicitly set its capacity. –  svick Aug 16 '13 at 11:42
    
@svick It may be filling too fast because of Thread.Sleep. BlockingCollection may help here... –  I4V Aug 16 '13 at 12:37
    
@I4V Ok, I didn't notice that. But my point is, not using Thread.Sleep() may help (and the issue may resurface later again for example when hardware changes). But setting capacity of the BlockingCollection is certain to help. With that, you can be sure you won't run out of memory. –  svick Aug 16 '13 at 13:06

Firstly it looks like you are writing to a file using lines as your blocks?

If you can get all the data into the object and write it out as larger blocks it will be faster. Currently you are probably hitting the IOPS max of the device you are writing to. Your lines are going to be tiny. So your write pattern is going to look like 4k Random IO.. or worse.

Using a different collection will not change the fact that the disk writes are the slowest thing you are doing.

Looking at concurrentbag it might not be directly possible but if you can remove lines from your bag and concat them into one big string/byte array closer to 1-5MB you should increase your performance. (You may need to insert CR LF's back into the string.)

share|improve this answer
    
Unless you set the FileOptions to WriteThrough it will buffer the writes, also it will be sequential writes not random writes, he is not seeking in-between calls, so performance will be not that bad –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 16 '13 at 7:14
    
Yes Scott is true the IO is not bad at all. I only get more data than I can write in the same amount of time. –  Arno 2501 Aug 16 '13 at 7:17
    
Fair enough, I wasn't sure of the caching behaviour of Line write. As long as it isn't flushing in between lines you can safely ignore me :D –  Insanemal Aug 16 '13 at 7:20
    
@ScottChamberlain: If your writing on a system that is doing pretty much anything else at the same time and using WriteThrough you can't ensure that short sequential writes will always happen as short sequential writes you have to assume worst case. –  Insanemal Aug 16 '13 at 7:30

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