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I have a two-dimensional array in Java that looks like this:

Each element/job has a:

  • Job number which is in index[0];
  • Job arrival time which is in index[1]; and
  • Job burst time in index[2]
jobs[0][0] = 1
jobs[0][1] = 0
jobs[0][2] = 5

jobs[1][0] = 2
jobs[1][1] = 2
jobs[1][2] = 19

jobs[2][0] = 3
jobs[2][1] = 4
jobs[2][2] = 10

First, I wanted to sort them according to arrival time which is according to index[1] which fortunately I did by using this code:

Arrays.sort(jobs, new Comparator<int[]>(){
    public int compare(int[] a, int[] b) {
        return a[1] - b[1];
    }
});


Now, my problem is I want to sort it according to burst time which is according to index[2]. Here is the TWIST... How can I be able to sort it according to burst time (index[2]) skipping the first element? I would like job[0] to remain on top of the array and sort the remaining elements by index[2] - burst time. Like this:

jobs[0][0] = 1
jobs[0][1] = 0
jobs[0][2] = 5

jobs[1][0] = 3
jobs[1][1] = 4
jobs[1][2] = 10

jobs[2][0] = 2
jobs[2][1] = 2
jobs[2][2] = 19

The jobs are being sorted by burst time with job1 remaining on top. Implementing it by the code I provided above would be much better. Thanks

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1  
too much of BOLD is hurting the eyes. –  Juned Ahsan Aug 16 '13 at 7:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A trivial way would be:

int firstBurst = jobs[0][2];
jobs[0][2] = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
Arrays.sort(jobs, new Comparator<int[]>(){
    public int compare(int[] a, int[] b) {
        // don't use subtraction, this can lead to underflows
        return a[2] < b[2] ? -1 : (a[2] == b[2] ? 0 : 1);
    }
});
jobs[0][2] = firstBurst;

Simply set the burst of the first item to Integer.MIN_VALUE (the integer equivalent of minus infinity). That way, it guaranteed that the first item is the smallest, so after sorting it will still be the first element. After sorting, reset the burst of the first item to its original value.

EDIT

By checking the documentation to verify that Arrays.sort is stable, I accidentally found the simplest version to solve this problem: use

Arrays.sort(T[] a,
            int fromIndex,
            int toIndex,
            Comparator<? super T> c)

then you can do this directly:

Arrays.sort(jobs, 1, jobs.length, new Comparator<int[]>(){
    public int compare(int[] a, int[] b) {
        // don't use subtraction, this can lead to underflows
        return a[2] < b[2] ? -1 : (a[2] == b[2] ? 0 : 1);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the return look like this return a[2] < b[2] ? -1 : (a[2] == b[2] ? 0 : 1); ? –  munyul Aug 16 '13 at 7:18
    
Tnx, forgot the colon... –  Vincent van der Weele Aug 16 '13 at 7:26
    
Sir, your code worked! thanks.can you have just a brief explanation about your code pls? –  Þaw Aug 16 '13 at 7:44
    
This code relies on Arrays.sort() being a stable sort. –  bowmore Aug 16 '13 at 7:44
    
@bowmore it is, right? Or am I confused with Collections.sort? –  Vincent van der Weele Aug 16 '13 at 7:50

First of all, you should use collections instead of arrays. And second, you should not use an array when you could use an object:

public class Job {
    private int number;
    private int arrival;
    private int burst;

    // constructor and getters omitted for brevity.
}

You could then have a List<Job>, instead of an int[][]. Just by looking at the typeof the structure, it's already clearer and more readable. Having named attributes, potentially of different types, and being able to add behavior with methods, is a part of what OO is all about. Much more readable, safe and maintainable than an int[].

The good news is that a List has much more features than an array. So you can for example, take a subList, and sort that subList:

List<Job> jobsExceptFirstOne = allJobs.subList(1);
Collections.sort(jobsExceptFirstOne, new Comparator<Job>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(Job left, Job right) {
        return Integer.compare(left.getBurst(), right.getBurst());
    }
});

Voilà. Problem solved.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your answer sir but unfortunately I dont know how to use LISTS and its quite a long code now and its kinda large change if I turn everything to LISTS :( –  Þaw Aug 16 '13 at 7:39
    
Then learn how to use them. It's something that any Java developer MUST know. Persisting with the bad design you have now will make things worse and worse. You'd better fix that ASAP. –  JB Nizet Aug 16 '13 at 9:41
    
Hopefully I will sir, thank you very much sir. I hope someday I'll be someone like you guys. professional developers. thank you very much sir –  Þaw Aug 17 '13 at 0:18

As stated by others, you should be using smarter collections instead of arrays, if you really want to use current code, you can use something like:

final int[][] jobs = new int[][]{{1,0,5},{2,2,19},{3,4,10}};

 Arrays.sort(jobs, new Comparator<int[]>(){
    public int compare(int[] a, int[] b) {
        if(Arrays.equals(a, jobs[0]))
         return -1;
        else
         return a[2] - b[2];
    }
});

System.out.println(jobs[0][2]);
System.out.println(jobs[1][2]);
System.out.println(jobs[2][2]);

The only drawback is your array needs to be final.

share|improve this answer
    
it sorted out including job[0] –  Þaw Aug 16 '13 at 7:38
    
job[0] will always be at the head using this, wasn't that the intent? –  rocketboy Aug 16 '13 at 7:40

Maybe there would be a way of using this:

final Integer job1 = Integer.valueOf(jobs[0][0]);
final Integer job2 = Integer.valueOf(jobs[0][1]);

return job1.compareTo(job2);

I dont really know if valueOf(jobs[0][0]) would be bigger then valueOf(jobs[0][1]), and I dont really know how they stand to one and another, but there must be a difference between them, and with that you should be a able to sort them according to if the returned number is bigger or smaller then the one of jobs[0][0], jobs[1][0], etc.

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Use a Comparator taht remembers the job number of the first job, and regards that as the smallest prior to checking burst time.

public class MyComparator implements Comparator<int[]> {

    private final int firstJob;

    public MyComparator(int firstJob) {
        this.firstJob = firstJob;
    }

    public int compare(int[] a, int[] b) {
        if (a[0] == b[0]) {
            return 0;
        }
        if (a[0] == firstJob) {
            return -1;
        }
        if (b[0] == firstJob) {
            return 1;
        }
        return Integer.compare(a[2], b[2]);
    }
}
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