Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to convert a string, containing hex values as characters, into a byte array. Although this has been answered already here as the first answer, I get the following error:

warning: ISO C90 does not support the ‘hh’ gnu_scanf length modifier [-Wformat]

Since I do not like warnings, and the omission of hh just creates another warning

warning: format ‘%x’ expects argument of type ‘unsigned int *’, but argument 3 has type ‘unsigned char *’ [-Wformat]

my question is: How to do this right? For completion, I post the example code here again:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    const char hexstring[] = "deadbeef10203040b00b1e50", *pos = hexstring;
    unsigned char val[12];
    size_t count = 0;

     /* WARNING: no sanitization or error-checking whatsoever */
    for(count = 0; count < sizeof(val)/sizeof(val[0]); count++) {
        sscanf(pos, "%2hhx", &val[count]);
        pos += 2 * sizeof(char);
    }

    printf("0x");
    for(count = 0; count < sizeof(val)/sizeof(val[0]); count++)
        printf("%02x", val[count]);
    printf("\n");

    return(0);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Consider strtol, this might help –  bash.d Aug 16 '13 at 7:18
    
Nothing that an extra variable can't solve. –  Hans Passant Aug 16 '13 at 7:26
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use strtol() instead.

Simply replace this line:

sscanf(pos, "%2hhx", &val[count]);

with:

char buf[10];
sprintf(buf, "0x%c%c", pos[0], pos[1]);
val[count] = strtol(buf, NULL, 0);

UPDATE: You can avoid using sprintf() using this snippet instead:

char buf[5] = {"0", "x", pos[0], pos[1], 0};
val[count] = strtol(buf, NULL, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
Updated answer to avoid sprintf –  mvp Aug 16 '13 at 7:52
1  
You can pass 16 as third argument of strtol instead of prefix "0x". –  Vovanium Aug 16 '13 at 11:35
add comment

You can either switch your compiler to C99 mode (the hh length modifier was standardised in C99), or you can use an unsigned int temporary variable:

unsigned int byteval;
if (sscanf(pos, "%2hhx", &byteval) != 1)
{
    /* format error */
}
val[count] = byteval;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Using mvp's suggested change, I created this function which includes error checking (invalid characters and uneven length).

This function will convert a hexadecimal string - NOT prepended with "0x" - with an even number of characters to the number of bytes specified. It will return -1 if it encounters an invalid character, or if the hex string has an odd length, and 0 on success.

//convert hexstring to len bytes of data
//returns 0 on success, -1 on error
//data is a buffer of at least len bytes
//hexstring is upper or lower case hexadecimal, NOT prepended with "0x"
int hex2data(unsigned char *data, const unsigned char *hexstring, unsigned int len)
{
    unsigned const char *pos = hexstring;
    char *endptr;
    size_t count = 0;

    if ((hexstring[0] == '\0') || (strlen(hexstring) % 2)) {
        //hexstring contains no data
        //or hexstring has an odd length
        return -1;
    }

    for(count = 0; count < len; count++) {
        char buf[5] = {'0', 'x', pos[0], pos[1], 0};
        data[count] = strtol(buf, &endptr, 0);
        pos += 2 * sizeof(char);

        if (endptr[0] != '\0') {
            //non-hexadecimal character encountered
            return -1;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.