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I have searched around and come across different kind of game loops. I have always used

Screen.java that extends JFrame, with also adds all the listeneres which is normally in two diffrent .java one for keyboard, one for mouse.

public void Draw(Graphics g){
    Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;
    //Everything that I render at the screen goes here, or I pass along g2 to them so they can be rendered. Such as level.draw(g2);
    repaint();
}

@Override
public void paint(Graphics g){
    Image offScreenBuffer = createImage(getWidth(), getHeight());
    Draw(offScreenBuffer.getGraphics());
    g.drawImage(offScreenBuffer, 0, 0, null);
}

And then in the main I have a normal Runnable loop with sleep

@Override
public void run(){
    while(true){
        //all update code goes here.
        try{ Thread.sleep(1); }catch(Exception e){}
    }
}

But i have seen people recommending using Timer, Semaphore, and TimerTask to create a run loop that takes care of the input, update, and lastly reneder. so I wounder which method is best? for it seams if I use TimerTask's to create the loop that render the game it seams that i need to lock it to a certain fps.

For what I have seen and understood I can use Timer and TimerTask to schedule the game updates. But else I don't how I need to change my code that much, or am I missing something here?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Duncan, MadProgrammer, Nathaniel Ford, Luc M, Andrew Marshall Aug 18 '13 at 4:55

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I've voted to close this question because it will attract opinionated answers and debate. Most "What is the best X?" questions are a bad fit for Stack Overflow. –  Duncan Aug 16 '13 at 7:51
    
While your paint method scares, apart from making sure that you updates to the screen are properly synchronised with the EDT, I would say your Runnable approach is probably the most sensible, so long as you are properly taking into consideration to try a keep the frame rate consistent... –  MadProgrammer Aug 16 '13 at 7:54
    
Well with the paint method I have right now keeps updating then i can. I can't say for my update method since i being to question it's stability when using Thread.sleep() –  Yemto Aug 16 '13 at 8:10
    
(Comment from ghoulfolk) I recommend you look up help and post possible future problems to this site: gamedevelopmentstackexchange –  Duncan Aug 16 '13 at 8:51

1 Answer 1

For games I'd recommend you to the time only to calculate the FPS. It's all about FPS:

private void run()
{
    long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long last = 0;
    int fps = 60;
    while(true)
    {
        if(now-last >= 1000/fps)
        {
            //do your stuff

            update();
            render();
            System.out.println("test");
            last = now;
        }
        now = System.currentTimeMillis();

    }
}

You could add some things here like instead of while(true) you could use a boolean to stop and start the game, maybe if you use different Gamestates. Also you could just update within this loop and render as often as possible. Also you can create an update(float elapsed) instead of an update() Method, so you can update positions and other stuff consistent.

Also look at this question: http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/59181/proper-method-to-update-and-draw-from-game-loop

share|improve this answer
    
It's about stability and then fps, however that seams to lock the fps to 60. If i use the method I have now the fps changes depending on what the computer can handle. It's just I need to get a good update() loop –  Yemto Aug 16 '13 at 8:03
    
You don't have to lock the fps ;) I just did so. Look at the Link i edited in. –  Loki Aug 16 '13 at 8:05
    
It's still locked... or at least restricted, when using my current method the frames updates whenever they computer can handle them –  Yemto Aug 16 '13 at 8:17

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