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This question already has an answer here:

So the code below is perfectly valid and it outputs 5 as excpected and the type of foo is inferred as System.Int32.

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var foo = 5;
       Console.WriteLine(foo);
    }
}

But if you write something like this

class Program
{
    static var foo = 5;

    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(foo);
    }
}

you get the following error:

The contextual keyword 'var' may only appear within a local variable declaration.

What is the problem of declaring variable using the var-keyword at class level? I don't quite understand this, so can anybody make it clear?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by xanatos, Soner Gönül, Jodrell, Alex Filipovici, Maarten Aug 16 '13 at 9:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

9  
take a look at this blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/01/26/… – Alessandro D'Andria Aug 16 '13 at 8:36
    
in short, because they can't. Definite duplicate I say. – Jodrell Aug 16 '13 at 8:44
    
Its like the general question, "why doesn't this thing do this thing that I want?" and the answer is, "because nobody made it do it yet." Followed by some detailed explanation of how difficult that it is. – Jodrell Aug 16 '13 at 8:50
    
So this site is running out of space or what ?? What if it is a duplicate why you care if questions are duplicate ?and i don't find it duplicate with question in reference but actually question referred is the answer for this question .Do not take advantages of privileges you got and please provide some answer also . – Suraj Singh Aug 16 '13 at 10:58

Well one reason could be Var is an cannot be accessed outside the scope it had declared , and static is something that persists and can be accessed globally(Here we can see conflicts of intrests) , So There goes your answer that you can not declare Var as static.
Implicitly Typed Local Variables

share|improve this answer
    
var is not necessarily an anonymous type. Consider var i= 1;, on the next line of code i.GetType() returns System.Int32. – Alex Filipovici Aug 16 '13 at 9:01
    
@AlexFilipovici Thanks for correcting me !!Well i hope i am on right direction please check my answer again and i do not have full explanation right now , If you can please guide me in right direction. – Suraj Singh Aug 16 '13 at 9:07

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