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I'm trying to think of a way to do this as a proc. Essentially the only part of the code that is different is that on substring match their is a .include? instead of a check for equals.

def check_exact_match(lead_attribute, tracker_attribute)
    return true if tracker_attribute.nil?
    return true if lead_attribute.downcase == tracker_attribute.downcase
    false
end


def check_substring_match(lead_attribute, tracker_attribute)
    return true if tracker_attribute.nil?
    return true if lead_attribute.downcase.include? tracker_attribute.downcase
    return false
end
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migrated from codereview.stackexchange.com Aug 16 '13 at 9:08

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1  
Note that return true if cond1; return true if cond2; false can also be written as just cond1 || cond2. –  sepp2k Aug 16 '13 at 9:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if I remember how to code in Ruby elegantly, but what about something like this?

def check­_match(lea­d_attribut­e, track­er_attribu­te)­
    track­er_attribu­te.nil? or yield lead_­attribute,­ track­er_attribu­te
end

The function can then be called like this:

check_match("abcd", "bd") { |l, t| l.downcase == t.downcase }
check_match(la, ta) { |l, t| l.downcase.include? t.downcase }
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I know the OP said he wanted a proc, but this would be much more idiomatic if it used a block instead. –  sepp2k Aug 16 '13 at 9:05
    
@sepp2k: I don't know, a block doesn't really stand for a predicate in my mind. –  busy_wait Aug 16 '13 at 10:01
1  
Lots of methods take a block as a predicate (select, find, all?, any?). I can't think of a single standard library method that takes a lambda/proc as a predicate (in fact the only standard library method that I can think of that takes a lambda at all is Hash#default_proc= and that's only because it would be syntactically impossible for it to take a block). –  sepp2k Aug 16 '13 at 10:06
    
I edited my code to make use of your suggestion. What do you think about it now? :) –  busy_wait Aug 16 '13 at 10:26
    
Idiomatic for expression is ||. –  tokland Aug 16 '13 at 19:28

Modification from @busy_wait.

def check­_match(lea­d_attribur­e, track­er_attribu­te, &condition)­
  track­er_attribu­te.nil? or condition.­call(lead_­attribute,­ track­er_attribu­te)
end

def check_exact_match(lead_attribute, tracker_attribute)
  check_match(lea­d_attribur­e, track­er_attribu­te) { |l, t| l.downcase == t.downcase }
end

def check_substring_match(lead_attribute, tracker_attribute)
  check_match(lea­d_attribur­e, track­er_attribu­te) { |l, t| l.downcase.include? t.downcase }
end
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