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So I am trying to find an answer to the question:

If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. The sum of these multiples is 23. Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000.

I am using C# and have a pretty good idea of what to do, but my code keeps counting the numbers that occur twice (e.g. 15, 30) and I would like to know the quickest/easiest way to counteract that. everything I have found so far has been in a different language so I am sorry if this seems relatively easy to you. This is what I have so far:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var result1 = 0;
        var result2 = 0;
        var result3 = 0;
        var uniqueInts3 = new List<int>();
        for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i += 3)
        {
            uniqueInts3.Add(i);
            result1 += i;
        }
        var uniqueInts5 = new List<int>();
        for (var o = 0; o < 1000; o += 5)
        {
            uniqueInts5.Add(o);
            result2 += o;
        }
        result3 += result1 + result2;
        Console.WriteLine(result3);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

I would love if someone could explain to me what to do as I am not sure at this point.

share|improve this question
    
What if you add all the ints in the same result and then remove duplicates and then sum them? –  Mikael Östberg Aug 16 '13 at 11:52
1  
As a very side comment, if you plan to check for duplicates while generating a list, then use HashSet<>. –  Sinatr Aug 16 '13 at 12:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not the most efficient way, but should work

var sum = 0;

for(int i=0;i<1000;i++)
{
   if(i%3==0||i%5==0) //checks if something is multiple of 3 or 5
      sum+=i; // sums only when it's multiple of 3 or 5
}

It ommits situations where something is multiple of 3 and 5. Takes each number once.

One line linq way:

var sum = Enumerable.Range(3, 1000).Sum(x => (x % 3 == 0 || x % 5 == 0) ? x : 0);

Fastest mathematical approach version:

var result = SumDivisbleBy(3,999)+SumDivisbleBy(5,999)-SumDivisbleBy(15,999);

private int SumDivisbleBy(int n, int p)
{
    return n*(p/n)*((p/n)+1)/2;
}

it calculates sum of all numbers divisible by 3 and 5 then substracts sum of numbers divisible by 15. Explanation: http://www.wikihow.com/Sum-the-Integers-from-1-to-N

share|improve this answer
1  
The O(1) solution has to be the winner. :) –  Matthew Watson Aug 16 '13 at 12:37
    
@MatthewWatson thanks, but your observation is also impressive :) –  wudzik Aug 16 '13 at 12:39
var sum = Enumerable.Range(1, 1000)
          .Where(i => i % 3 == 0 || i % 5 == 0)
          .Sum();
share|improve this answer

Here are my 2 cents

Version 1, using a for loop.

int sum = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    if (new[] {3, 5}.Any(n => i % n == 0)) 
        sum += i;

Version 2, using C# Linq

var sum =
    Enumerable.Range(1, 10 - 1)
       .Where(e => new[] { 3, 5 }.Any(n => e % n == 0))
       .Sum();

Enumerable.Range(1, 10 - 1) creates a sequence of integers from 0 to 9 (less than 10).

.Where(..) is a method that filters the original sequence.

new[] {3, 5} creates another sequence containing only 3 and 5.

.Any(n => e % n == 0) takes 3 and 5 and the Modulo operation is performed on each number in the original sequence. Where the result is 0, the Any method returns true which in turn means that the Where method includes the number in the result.

And in the end there is the sum.

share|improve this answer
    
request is for 1000 range not 10 :) I think that using array here (new[] { 3, 5 }) is a little bit overkill (just my opinion) :) –  wudzik Aug 16 '13 at 12:12
    
What I am trying to prove with using the array is that you can use it as an input parameter without altering the algorithm. And for the 10/1000 thing, come on man :) –  Mikael Östberg Aug 16 '13 at 12:25
    
10/1000 <-- just saying ;] ok, array thing is usefull here, sorry :) –  wudzik Aug 16 '13 at 12:30

Just to provide an alternative approach...

Firstly, we can observe that the multiples of 3 and 5 have gaps between them in the following repeating sequence:

2, 1, 3, 1, 2, 3, 3

Given that, we can write a method which computes the total like so:

int sumMultiplesOf3And5UpTo(int n)
{
    int i = 3;
    int j = 0;
    int t = 0;

    int[] increments = new []{2, 1, 3, 1, 2, 3, 3};

    while (i <= n)
    {
        t += i;
        i += increments[j++%7];
    }

    return t;
}

For ultimate speed, you can "unroll the increment array" like so:

int sumMultiplesOf3And5UpTo(int n)
{
    int i = 3;
    int t = 0;

    while (true)
    {
        t += i;
        i += 2;
        if (i > n) break;

        t += i;
        i += 1;
        if (i > n) break;

        t += i;
        i += 3;
        if (i > n) break;

        t += i;
        i += 1;
        if (i > n) break;

        t += i;
        i += 2;
        if (i > n) break;

        t += i;
        i += 3;
        if (i > n) break;

        t += i;
        i += 3;
        if (i > n) break;
    }

    return t;
}

I would never really implement it like this; it's just a curiosity (and an example of a different approach).

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! [spacespacespace] –  Mikael Östberg Aug 16 '13 at 12:28

One easy way is just loop all the numbers from 1 to 1,000 and see if they are multiplies of 3 or 5, if they are, just add them to a result variable outside the loop. As this is a project euler question, I'll let you figure the code by yourself. Good luck!

P.S., check out the % operator, it'll help you.

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Try this to get the result before WriteLine()

var sum = uniqueInts3.Concat(uniqueInts5).Distinct().Sum()

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I played a little around and that's my solution:

private static int sumMultiples(int max, int small, int big)
{
    int sum = 0;

    int diff_add = big - small;
    int diff = diff_add;
    int next = small;
    while (next < max)
    {
        sum += next;

        if (next + diff < max
            && (next + diff) % small != 0)
        {
            sum += next + diff;
        }
        diff += diff_add;

        next += small;
    }

    return sum;
}

The while-loop runs max/small times.

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