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As part of a visualisation, I'd like to add thousands separators to any numbers (contiguous string of digits) in a string. It needn't consider the context of the number e.g.

1234e+56789 Nokia 3210s cost $123456.7890 and my phone number is 123-4567-89012.

becomes

1,234e+56,789 Nokia 3,210s cost $123,456.7,890 and my phone number is 123-4,567-89,012.

I know I can reverse the string, replace \d{3}(?=\d) with $&, and reverse it again, but is there a way to do it with regular expressions only (preferably just one)?

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1  
Looks like Notepad++ does not support positive lookaheads...so might be better writing a little script. –  epascarello Aug 16 '13 at 12:48
2  
@epascarello it sure does. make sure to updated to NP++ 6. –  Martin Büttner Aug 16 '13 at 12:49
    
AH I am sitting on 5.X :) –  epascarello Aug 16 '13 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's pretty much the same as your attempt, just reversed and with a quantifier:

\d(?=(?:\d{3})+(?!\d))

And replace that with $&,.

The (?:\d{3})+ makes sure that there is a multiple of 3 digits following and the (?!\d) then makes sure that there is no fourth or fifth digit following.

If you want to use this in Notepad++ make sure to upgrade to version 6.

Note that in Notepad++ you could also use a lookbehind:

(?<=\d)(?=(?:\d{3})+(?!\d))

And replace that with ,.

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Thanks for explanation, too! –  Gnubie Aug 16 '13 at 13:18

You could use this expression:

((?<=\d)\d{3}(?=\D|(?:\d{3})*(?:\D|$)))

And replace by ,$1.

The lookbehind makes sure there's a number before the 3 digits we're matching.

The 3 digits we're matching are the 'thousands' you want to put a comma before.

The lookahead makes sure there's either a non-digit after, or a set of triplets of digits.

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Thanks. As m.buettner noted, Notepad++ 6 is needed for look-behind. –  Gnubie Aug 16 '13 at 13:16
    
@Gnubie Yes, I didn't know you were on earlier versions. His expression is better than mine anyway :) –  Jerry Aug 16 '13 at 14:29

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