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I have a simple bandwidth test using node js, socket.io and fs for stream file streaming. My goal is to reach Gigabit speed which I've done however my problem is I'm streaming data so quickly, I'm crashing my browser on the client side. (FF and Chrome) I'm not sure if I'm missing something or if I'm just writing inefficient code.

I'm not concerned with the data on the client side so I suspect if there's a javascript equivalent to sending the data directly to /dev/null that would fix my problem but I'm not aware of anything like that.

Does anyone have any suggestions or ran into something similar?

Server side:

var io = require('socket.io').listen(81), fs = require('fs');
var connectedsocketlist = []; 

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    connectedsocketlist.push(socket);
    var readStream = fs.createReadStream("2Gig.txt", {
            'encoding': 'base64', 
            mode: 0666, 
            autoClose: true,
            bufferSize: 1024});

    console.log(io.sockets.manager.rooms);
    io.set('log level', 2, 'transports', ['websocket']); // reduce logging

    readStream.on('data', function(data) {
            socket.volatile.send(data);
    }); 
});

Client Side:

<html>
<script type="text/javascript" src="js/socket.io.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery-2.0.1.min.js"></script>
<script>
    var SPEED = {};
    var startTime;
    SPEED.bCount = 0;

    var socket = io.connect('http://10.0.1.22:81',{resource:'socket.io', 'force new     connection':false});

    socket.on('message', function (data) {
            SPEED.bCount = SPEED.bCount + data.length;
            SPEED.bitsPerSecon = Math.floor( (SPEED.bCount * 8)  / Math.floor(($.now() -  SPEED.startTime) / 1000)*100/100); 
            $("#speed").text(Math.floor (SPEED.bitsPerSecon /1000 /1000 ) * 100 /100 );
    });
</script>
<body>
<div style="solid #ccc" id="speed">&nbsp;</div>
</body></html>

Screen Shot 2013-08-16 at 10.58.20 AM

share|improve this question
    
Could you show us the memory profile from Chrome's devtools? – Bergi Aug 16 '13 at 14:00
    
Added a screen shot from Chrome/Devtools not really sure if that's what you're looking for. – cubicalmonkey Aug 16 '13 at 15:08
    
Thank you. Hmm, garbage collection seems to work correctly. Does it look different right before the crash? – Bergi Aug 16 '13 at 15:18

After fixing a number of logic errors in your script and wrapping it under a default express server, I find no appreciable increase in memory while transfering a 2.2GB file from server to client.

I ran with both socket.volatile.send() and socket.volatile.emit() with no discernible difference in speed.

Server: node.js v0.8.6 on Fedora release 11 (Leonidas)
Client: Google Chrome Version 28.0.1500.95 m

Server Source: app.js

/**
 * Module dependencies.
 */

var express=require('express'),
    app=express(),
    http=require('http'),
    server=http.createServer(app),
    io=require('socket.io').listen(server),
    routes=require('./routes'),
    user=require('./routes/user'),
    path=require('path'),
    fs=require('fs');

// all environments -- express defaults
app.set('port', process.env.PORT || 3000);
app.set('views', __dirname + '/views');
app.set('view engine', 'jade');
app.use(express.favicon());
app.use(express.logger('dev'));
app.use(express.bodyParser());
app.use(express.methodOverride());
app.use(app.router);
app.use(express.static(path.join(__dirname, 'public')));
app.use(express.errorHandler());

app.get('/', routes.index);
app.get('/users', user.list);

var connectedsocketlist=[];

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {

    console.log('socket connected');

    connectedsocketlist.push(socket);

    var readStream=fs.createReadStream("./public/2Gig.txt", {
        'encoding': 'base64',
        mode:       0666,
        autoClose:  true,
        bufferSize: 1024
    });

     console.log(io.sockets.manager.rooms);

     io.set('log level', 2, 'transports', ['websocket']); // reduce logging

     readStream.on('data', function(data) {
         //socket.volatile.send(data);
         socket.volatile.emit('message',data);
     });

     readStream.on('end',function(){
        console.log('DATA COMPLETE');
        socket.volatile.emit('data_complete');
     });

 });

// start it up...
server.listen(app.get('port'), function(){
  console.log('Express server listening on port ' + app.get('port'));
});

Client Source: test.html

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
    <div>Elapsed Seconds:<span style="color:#ccc;background-color:#000;" id="seconds">&nbsp;</span></div>
    <div>Bits per second:<span style="color:#ccc;background-color:#000;" id="bitSpeed">&nbsp;</span></div>
    <div>Bytes per second:<span style="color:#ccc;background-color:#000;" id="byteSpeed">&nbsp;</span></div>
    <div id="msg">&nbsp;</div>

    <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="/socket.io/socket.io.js"></script>
    <script>
        var socket=io.connect()
            SPEED={
                startTime:Date.now(),
                elapsedSeconds:0,
                totalBits:0,
                totalBytes:0,
                bitsPerSecond:0,
                bytesPerSecond:0
            };

        socket.on('message', function (data) {
            var numBytes=data.length,
                now=Date.now();

            SPEED.totalBytes=SPEED.totalBytes+numBytes;
            //console.log('received %s bytes of data (%s bytes total)',numBytes,SPEED.totalBytes);

            SPEED.elapsedSeconds=Math.floor((now-SPEED.startTime)/1000);
            $('#seconds').text(SPEED.elapsedSeconds);

            SPEED.totalBits=SPEED.totalBits+(numBytes*8);
            SPEED.bitsPerSecond=Math.floor(SPEED.totalBits/SPEED.elapsedSeconds);
            $('#bitSpeed').text(SPEED.bitsPerSecond);

            SPEED.bytesPerSecond=Math.floor(SPEED.totalBytes/SPEED.elapsedSeconds);
            $('#byteSpeed').text(SPEED.bytesPerSecond);
        });

        socket.on('data_complete',function(){
            $('#msg').text('DATA IS COMPLETE');
        });

    </script>
</body>
</html>

SERVER OUTPUT

> node app.js
   info  - socket.io started
Express server listening on port 3000
GET /test.html 200 4ms - 1.45kb
   debug - served static content /socket.io.js
   debug - client authorized
   info  - handshake authorized SgL8H5FaXzGGZdmuBebk
   debug - setting request GET /socket.io/1/websocket/SgL8H5FaXzGGZdmuBebk
   debug - set heartbeat interval for client SgL8H5FaXzGGZdmuBebk
   debug - client authorized for
   debug - websocket writing 1::
socket connected
{ '': [ 'SgL8H5FaXzGGZdmuBebk' ] }
DATA COMPLETE
^C
>

CLIENT RESULT

Request: http://hostname:3000/test.html

Response:
    Elapsed Seconds:353
    Bits per second:84686466
    Bytes per second:10585808
    DATA IS COMPLETE
share|improve this answer
    
Could you be more specific about the "logic errors" you fixed? – Bergi Aug 17 '13 at 16:50
    
Thank you, however I'm still seeing browsers crash when reaching transfer speeds greater then 300Mbps. Testing Firefox and Chrome seems to be overwhelming the browser by sending data too quickly. – cubicalmonkey Aug 18 '13 at 18:28
    
Just an update, I'm testing this same code using ws instead of socket.io. I'm fairing much better and actually continuously send data over 600Mbps for hours on end using FireFox and even IE10. Oddly Chrome's memory usage (as viewed in Windows Task Manager) steadily increases and eventually Chrome crashes. Googling around for Chrome Websocket crash it seems there may be a Chrome bug there but most of those posts are old shrug. – cubicalmonkey Aug 23 '13 at 2:56

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