Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider:

if (condition1)
{
    // Code block 1
}
else
{
    // Code block 2
}

If I know that condition1 will be true the majority of the time, then I should code the logic as written, instead of:

if (!condition1)
{
    // Code block 2
}
else
{
    // Code block 1
}

since I will avoid the penalty of the jump to the second code block (note: I have limited knowledge of assembly language). Does this idea carry forward to switch statements and case labels?

switch (myCaseValue)
{
    case Case1:
        // Code block 1
        break;

    case Case2:
        // Code block 2
        break;

    // etc.
}

If I know that one of the cases will happen more often, can I rearrange the order of the case labels so that it's more efficient? Should I? In my code I've been ordering the case labels alphabetically for code readability without really thinking about it. Is this micro-optimization?

share|improve this question
8  
This is a micro-optimization. –  Michael Burr Dec 1 '09 at 16:44
5  
@Andy E: But my real point is that people seem to assume that people asking questions on SO don't know basic things, e.g. its a mistake to spend a lot of time optimizing code that doesn't need to be fast. They then pounce on that instead of answering the harder question. –  PeterAllenWebb Dec 1 '09 at 17:11
2  
Well, the OP asks for an optimization. While there is general consensus that premature optimization is evil, this does not neccessarily make any micro-optimization bad. Why don't you assume, that the OP has done all macro optimization and now wants to do some more? Granted, such cases may be very rare, but @Andy E: Just because you don't seem to know any application where the performance of a switch doesn't matter, it is wrong to assume they don't exist. And if the difference in execution speed is noticable, is up to the beholder. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 1 '09 at 17:53
4  
Micro-optimization or not, I find the question interesting. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Dec 1 '09 at 18:37
3  
There's no such thing as "prematire optimization" outside of specific context. When someone asks an abstract context-less question about optimization, as the OP in this case, attacking the poster with "premature optimization" remarks is one of the most meaningless things one can do. If the OP wants to know whether their optimization is "premature", the OP will ask about it specifically, providing the proper context. Until then, please keep the baseless "prematire optimization" comments out of the discussion. –  AndreyT Dec 1 '09 at 21:29

9 Answers 9

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Some facts for modern hardware like x86 or x86_64:

  • A unconditionally taken branch has almost no additional costs, besides the decoding. If you want a number, it's about a quarter clock cycle.
  • A conditional branch, which was correctly predicted, has almost no additional costs.
  • A conditional branch, which was not correctly predicted, has a penalty equal to the length of the processor pipelines, this is about 12-20 clocks, depending on the hardware.
  • The prediction mechanisms are very sophisticated. Loops with a low number of iterations (on Core 2 for example up to 64) can be perfectly predicted. Small repeating patterns like "taken-taken-nottaken-taken" can be predicted, if they are not too long (IIRC 6 on Core2).

You can read more about branch prediction in Agner Fogs excellent manual.

Switch statements are usually replaced by a jump table by the compiler. In most cases the order of cases won't make a difference at all. There are prediction mechanisms for indirect jumps as well.

So the question isn't if your jumps are more likely to be taken, it is if they are well predictable, at least for the hardware you intend to run your code on. This isn't an easy question at all. But if you have branches depending on a random (or pseudo random) condition, you could try to reformulate it as a branchless statement if possible.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer so far. Except for microcontrollers, do not assume a 1:1 translation of your C code in pseudo-machine code. In modern processors there are a lot of parameters that are invisible to your C code that can have an impact on performance: cache-locality, TLB, register-spills, page-faults, branch predictions, associativity of cache... All these can have unexpected impacts on your optimisation efforts. –  tristopia Dec 1 '09 at 17:41
1  
You assume that the processor is not evaluating both sides of the branch simultaniously (until the expression has been evaluated). When I was back at Uni (20 years ago) they were already doing things along these lines. I have not kept up with the field but I assume that it will be more common now. –  Loki Astari Dec 1 '09 at 18:14
    
AFAIK current desktop processors do not evaluate both sides simultaniosly, probably because this would require double prefetchers, double decoders and more execution units etc. This resources are probably more effectively used in a second logical core (aka hyperthreading). GPUs do always execute both sides of a branch - but for other reasons, and they don't do it simultaniously. But there may exist such a thing, but I was speaking mainly of x86 and the like. I stated that in my first verion, but edited it out. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 1 '09 at 19:40
3  
What you are talking about is predication which exists in Itanium for example, where both sides of a condition are evaluated and the "right" one is kept, the "wrong" one discarded. This avoids pipeline stalls but at the cost of a lot of power (the processor does unecessary work). It is better to have a better branch predictor imho. –  tristopia Dec 1 '09 at 20:56
1  
Actually there is a working branch prediction in some processors for indirect jumps (jump tables). For example, indirect jumps up to 36 different targets can be predicted perfectly on a Core2. Please check agner.org/optimize/microarchitecture.pdf –  hirschhornsalz Dec 2 '09 at 17:46

Your conclusion regarding the if statements will not be true on most of the hardware I'm familiar with. The problem is not that you are jumping, but that you are branching. The code could go two different ways, depending on the result of a comparison. This can stall the pipeline on most modern CPUs. Branch prediction is common, and fixes the problem most of the time, but has nothing to do with your example. The predictor can equally well predict that a comparison will be false as it can that it will be true.

As usual, see wikipedia: Branch Predictor

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please show how this works in assembly? –  Jon Seigel Dec 1 '09 at 16:54
    
I don't think an assembly listing would make it clear what's going on. You would have to look at a simulation of a particular CPU step by step over many loops over the if statement. –  PeterAllenWebb Dec 1 '09 at 16:58
    
The compiler could easily invert the condition there. Trying to guess how an if statement is translated to code by the compiler is less than meaningless. This is doubly true if the compiler is optimizing. –  deft_code Dec 1 '09 at 22:08

It depends. The compiler will use a bunch of internal implementation-dependent criteria to decide whether to implement the switch as a sequence of if-like tests, or as a jump table. This might depend, for example, on how "compact" your set of case labels is. If your case label values form a "dense" set, the compiler is probably more likely to use a jump table, in which case the ordering of case labels won't matter. If it decides to go with what resembles a sequence of if-else tests, the order might matter.

Keep in mind though, that the body of switch is one large statement, with case labels providing multiple entry points into that statement. For that reason, the compilers ability (as well as yours) to rearrange the case "sub-blocks" within that statement might be limited.

share|improve this answer

Case labels should be ordered in the most effecient way for readability.

Reordering case labels for efficiency is a case of premature optimization unless a profiler has specifically told you this is a problem.

share|improve this answer
8  
not answering the question, this is like a basic copy-paste answer for all performance questions –  Ramónster Dec 1 '09 at 18:46
5  
I agree with Ramonster. This is a pat answer and should be a comment at most. –  Richard Simões Dec 1 '09 at 18:49
4  
@Ramónster, yes indeed it's a copy / paste answer because it's essentially the same question. It doesn't make the answer any less correct and making it a comment certainly doesn't change it's correctness. This is premature optimization. –  JaredPar Dec 1 '09 at 19:02
1  
@Ramónster, exactly. The lack of context indicates it is indeed premature optimization. Only a profile indicating a particular case is slow is enough context to diagnose this problem. Anything else is simply guessing. –  JaredPar Dec 1 '09 at 19:11
3  
You were guessing that his code was not in a hot spot. A good answer would've had an explanation about performance optimizations in reordering switch/case statements, and as a side note mention that it's a waste if it's not hot code. –  Ramónster Dec 1 '09 at 19:16

I think that even your initial premise - that you can optimize the if statement by rearranging the conditional may well be faulty. In a non-optimized build you might find doing what you're talking about has some value - maybe. In the general case you're going to have to jump at least once for either case, so there's no advantage (in general) to arranging the conditional anyway. But that's for non-optimized builds, so who cares about that optimization?

In optimized builds, I think you might be surprised by what a compiler sometimes generates for an if statement. The compiler may move one or the other (or both) cases to somewhere out-of-line. I think that you trying to optimize this naively by playing with which condition 'comes first' won't necessarily do what you want. At best you should do this only after examining what the compiler is generating. And, of course, this becomes an expensive process, since even the slightest change you make around the statement can change how the compiler decides to generate the output code.

Now, as far as the switch statement is concerned, I'd always go with using a switch when it makes the code more readable. The worst that a compiler should do with a switch statement that is equivalent to an if statement is to generate the same code. For more than a few cases, switch statements will generally be compiled as a jump table. But then again a set of if tests that are comparing a single variable to a set of values might very well be recognized by a compiler such that it'll do the same. However, I'd guess that using a switch will enable to compiler to recognize the situation much more readily.

If you're really interested in getting the most out of the performance of that conditional, you might consider using something like MSVC's Profile Guided Optimization (PGO or 'pogo')which uses the results of profiling runs to optimize how conditionals get generated. I don't know whether or not if GCC has similar capabilities.

share|improve this answer
1  
For gcc this is -fgenerate-profile and -fuse-profile. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 1 '09 at 20:44
    
this is such a better answer than all of the talk about processor architectures, please upvote. –  deft_code Dec 1 '09 at 22:17
    
@Caspin: one thing that the processor-specific discussion highlights is that it's really impossible to guess what the performance of a construct like this will be - even if you look at at the generated assembly. So much is happening even behind the assembly code that you really need to measure to know what's going on. Looking at this strictly from C level is maybe like trying to direct traffic at a city intersection from an airplane. –  Michael Burr Dec 1 '09 at 22:30

I'm not sure about the C# compiler, but I know that in assembly a switch statement can actually be programmed as a jump to a specific line, rather than evaluating the expression like an if statement. Since in a select you have all constants, it just treats cases as line numbers and you jump directly to the line number (case value) passed in without any evaluation. This makes the order of the case statements not really matter at all.

share|improve this answer

I assume you're aware that it will only matter if this is a hotspot. The best way to tell if it's a hotspot is to run the code, sample the program counter, and see if it's in there more than 10% of the time. If it is a hotspot, see how much time is spent in doing the if or switch. Usually it is negligible, unless your Block 1 and/or Block 2 do almost nothing. You can use a profiler for this. I just pause it repeatedly.

If you're not familiar with assembly language I would suggest learning it, enough to understand what the compiler generates. It's interesting and not hard.

share|improve this answer

As others have said, it depends on lots of things, including how many cases there are, how optimization is done, and the architecture you're running on. For an interesting overview, see http://ols.fedoraproject.org/GCC/Reprints-2008/sayle-reprint.pdf

share|improve this answer

If you put the cases that happen most often first, this will optimize the code slightly, and because of the way switch statments work the same is true. When the program goes into switch and finds a case that's true, it will execute it and hit break, which will exit out of the loop. Your thinking is correct.

However, I do think this optimization is pretty minimal, and if it slows your development time to do this, it's probably not worth it. Also if you have to modify your program flow drastically to accommodate this, it's probably not worth it. You're only saving a couple cycles at most and likely would never see the improvement.

share|improve this answer
2  
There's no guarantee that lexical order will be taken into account. The compiler is free to reorder the cases in any way it sees fit. It will likely do a better job of doing so than the programmer can. Hence, it's best to write them in an order that's easiest to understand or best communicates intent. If order bias is important, use a cascading conditional statement (if-else if-else). Othewise, leave the optimization to the compiler. –  seh Dec 1 '09 at 16:50
2  
The compiler is only free to do that if there are unconditional break statements (or equivalent) at the end of each case "segment", and if the compiler is smart enopugh to recognize them (of course, modern compilers are). If there are no such break statements there, the segments are not rearrangeable, since the entire body of switch is one big compound statement with pre-determined internal ordering. –  AndreyT Dec 1 '09 at 17:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.