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I have a big ass mysql table, and I need to get most recent 1000 rows that match a condition. The obvious way is doing

try {
    $stmt = $dbh->prepare("SELECT id, date, field1, field2 
    FROM big_ass_table
    WHERE field1 >= 1000 and field2 <=4550
    ORDER BY date DESC LIMIT 0,1000");
    $stmt->execute();
    while ($row = $stmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC)) {
        print_r($row);
    }
    $stmt = null;
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    print $e->getMessage();
}

but this table is already 15M rows and the temporary SORT by date is taking forever. Casting it as a unix timestamp integer doesn't help much either.

I've tried using MongoDB for this task and building an index with reverse order on DATE does the trick without any sorting:

$cursor=$mongodb->big_ass_table
->find(array('$and'=>array($conditions)))
->hint( "date_-1" )
->limit(1000);

There are a number of reasons to keep using mysql for this task (although I'm growing more and more fond of MongoDB) so I'm hoping there's a way for mysql, specially PDO Mysql, to search backwards.

According to MySQL documentation:

An index_col_name specification can end with ASC or DESC. These keywords are permitted for future extensions for specifying ascending or descending index value storage. Currently, they are parsed but ignored; index values are always stored in ascending order.

So I'm at a deadend here. Then I resorted to PDO. Is it possible to make it work with something like

try {
    $stmt = $dbh->prepare("SELECT id, date, field1, field2 
    FROM big_ass_table
    WHERE field1 >= 1000 and field2 <=4550
    LIMIT 0,1000", array(PDO::ATTR_CURSOR => PDO::CURSOR_SCROLL));
    $stmt->execute();
    $row = $stmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC, PDO::FETCH_ORI_LAST);
    do {
      print_r($row);
    } while ($row = $stmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC, PDO::FETCH_ORI_PRIOR));
    $stmt = null;
}   catch (PDOException $e) {
    print $e->getMessage();
}

note I've removed the ORDER clause from the last one. I believe this way I'll still be capturing the first 1000 rows and then just printing them backwards, with isn't what I need to do. ¿Perhaps if I remove the LIMIT clause and then manually close the cursor when I reach 1000 rows would work? ¿Or would I be overloading the DB engine?

share|improve this question
    
Just some tips on the MongoDB side - you don't need $and as it is the default, and you should avoid hint() - just a sort( { date: -1 } ); will do the trick. –  Derick Aug 16 '13 at 13:57
    
I'm not reading anything about the indexes in mysql? What is your mysql data definition? Maybe better indices will fix your problem without going to mongo... –  Nanne Aug 16 '13 at 14:02
    
@Derick I'm actually achieving better speeds with hinting than sorting in mongo, but the difference is negligible. –  amenadiel Aug 16 '13 at 20:20
    
@Nanne, the data definition is id, date, text, latitude, longitude, geometry (which is just POINT(latitude,longitude). –  amenadiel Aug 16 '13 at 20:21
    
but you miss the kicker: what fields did you index in mysql? –  Nanne Aug 17 '13 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are at least 2 tricks to speed up your query.

  1. To add some condition that uses index yet reduces the number of rows to sort. Say, to limit by some certain date which guaranteed to be out the range.
  2. To create a reverse index - the very unix timestamp, but a negated one, with - in front. This way you will have an index by data but in reverse order. Don't forget to make this field of signed int type.
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I can narrow the search down ex ante, but I really like the second option. I'll go with that one! thanks! –  amenadiel Aug 16 '13 at 20:26
    
Worked like a charm. Plus, indexing on an integer field was a lot cheaper than doing it on a timestamp. –  amenadiel Aug 17 '13 at 2:47

What I usually doing in this case:

1, SELECT MIN(id) as min_id FROM table WHERE condition

2, SELECT MAX(id) as max_id FROM table WHERE condition

3, SELECT * FROM table WHERE id>=min_id AND id<=max_id AND condition ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1000

This way you are only doing the sorting on your matched list. Of course if your matched list is huge then you have a problem. In that case look into partitioning the table

share|improve this answer
    
I believe that could work, but I'd be enqueuing 3 queries instead of one. Not sure of what will happen. As per partitioning, I'd have to drop the FULLTEXT index on the text field, which is one of the conditions in my search (usually I'm querying for matching text in a bounding geometric box). –  amenadiel Aug 16 '13 at 20:25

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