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I'm using the excellent jquery.validation plugin by Jörn Zaefferer and I was wondering whether there's a easy way to automatically trim form elements before they are validated?

The following is a cut down but working example of a form which validates a email address:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" />
    <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="http://ajax.microsoft.com/ajax/jquery.validate/1.5.5/jquery.validate.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    $().ready(function() {
        $("#commentForm").validate({
            rules: {
                email: {
                    required: true,
                    email: true
                }
            }
        });
    });
    </script>
</head>
<body>

<form class="cmxform" id="commentForm" method="get" action="">
<label for="cemail">E-Mail:</label><input id="cemail" name="email" class="required email" />
<input class="submit" type="submit" value="Submit"/>
</form>

</body>
</html>

The problem is that some users are getting confused because they accidently enter some whitespace in their email address, e.g. "test@test.com ". And the form won't submit and has a error message: "Please enter a valid email address.". Non-techy users don't know how to spot whitespace and may just quit the site rather than try to work out what they've done wrong.

Anyway, I was hoping I could chain "jQuery.trim(value)" before the validation so the whitespace is removed and the validation error never occurs?

I could use addMethod to build my own email validation function. But I'm sure there's a more elegant solution?

share|improve this question
1  
Great question. Jörn said he would fix this as part of the plugin itself. But that was about a year ago. I can confirm that white space at the end of a field does make it invalid for me. I'm using version 1.5.5. (Jorn's post: mail-archive.com/jquery-en@googlegroups.com/msg55651.html) –  Nathan Long Dec 1 '09 at 17:15
    
Reading this question and all the answers makes me feel as if HTML is just so damned broken. –  g33kz0r Jun 13 '13 at 15:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I did this with success.

Instead of:

Email: { required: true, email: true }

I did this:

Email: {
    required: {
        depends:function(){
            $(this).val($.trim($(this).val()));
            return true;
        }
    },
    email: true
}
share|improve this answer
    
The beauty of this approach is that the server side receives clean (trimmed) values too. But it would be quite an effort to add this if you have many validated forms with similar requirements. This is why I've combined this with @hwiechers' answer below :) –  Halil Özgür Mar 27 '12 at 16:20
    
... A warning could be useful where this is used: "Leading and trailing spaces are not valid and trimmed." Especially for users who want to use a password with leading/trailing spaces. They would be unable to log in since the recorded passwords would be different from the ones they'd intended. –  Halil Özgür Mar 27 '12 at 16:26
3  
A warning for an issue which I've detected after using this for quite some time: if the form is submitted while the the field is invalid, entering legitimate space (e.g. the ones between names and surnames) afterwards into it gets hard esp. for slower typers: jsfiddle.net/halilim/ftwqg Set onkeyup: false to prevent this. –  Halil Özgür Mar 28 '13 at 21:03
    
@HalilÖzgür where do I have to put "onkeyup: false" to prevent that issue? Thank you! –  superpuccio Feb 10 at 9:07
    
@superpuccio for all of your validations: jQuery.validator.setDefaults({ onkeyup: false /* , other defaults */ }); for a single instance: <selector>.validate({ onkeyup: false, rules: { /* ... */ } }); –  Halil Özgür Feb 10 at 9:29

This code works for me. I haven't used it much so there may be bugs.

It wraps each method and trims the first element which is value.

(function ($) {

    $.each($.validator.methods, function (key, value) {
        $.validator.methods[key] = function () {           
            if(arguments.length > 0) {
                arguments[0] = $.trim(arguments[0]);
            }

            return value.apply(this, arguments);
        };
    });
} (jQuery));
share|improve this answer
1  
Very useful since all methods in all forms can be modified once. To combine this with the above (accepted) answer, replace arguments[0] = $.trim(arguments[0]); with var el = $(arguments[1]); el.val($.trim(el.val())); (two lines). –  Halil Özgür Mar 27 '12 at 16:21
    
A note after using this for quite a time: see my warning comment under the accepted answer, which is especially true when you apply trimming to all fields. –  Halil Özgür Mar 28 '13 at 21:04

Since I want this behavior on all my forms by default I decided to modify the jquery.validate.js file. I applied the following change to onfocusout method:

Original:

onfocusout: function (element, event) {
    if (!this.checkable(element) && (element.name in this.submitted || !this.optional(element))) {
        this.element(element);
    }
}

To:

onfocusout: function (element, event) {
    if (element.tagName === "TEXTAREA" || (element.tagName === "INPUT" && element.type !== "password")) {
        element.value = $.trim(element.value);
    }
    if (!this.checkable(element) && (element.name in this.submitted || !this.optional(element))) {
        this.element(element);
    }
}

I do want to allow spaces at the begging and end of password.

autoTrim could be added as a property to options.

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When downloading validator.js, there is a file called additional-methods.js that contains the method "nowhitespace" and "lettersonly" that will strip out any white space in a field.

rules: {
  user_name: {
    required: true,
    minlength: 3,
    nowhitespace: true
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Could you not bind the trim to a blur event? Something like...

$("#cemail").blur(function(){
  $(this).val(jQuery.trim($(this).val());
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion - I tried it out but unfortunately, the order that the events trigger is random and often the validation is done before the trimming - so the user gets a error and also has their input corrected so probably gets even more confused. –  Tom Dec 1 '09 at 22:11
1  
What about changing it to .change()? When does the validation get triggered then? Isn't it usually on form submit? –  Psytronic Dec 2 '09 at 9:01
    
I think it would. I tried adding $('#cemail').bind('change',function (e) { $(this).val($.trim($(this).val()));}); AFTER the jQuery library but BEFORE the validation plugin seems to work –  robnardo Jan 30 at 20:22

For reference, until I find a more elegant solution, I'm using addMethod as follows:

// Extend email validation method so that it ignores whitespace
jQuery.validator.addMethod("emailButAllowTrailingWhitespace", function(value, element) {
    return (this.optional(element) || jQuery.validator.methods.email.call(this, jQuery.trim(value), element));
}, "Please enter a valid email");

$().ready(function() {
    $("#commentForm").validate({
        rules: {
            cemail: {
                required: true,
                emailButAllowTrailingWhitespace: true
            }
        }
    });
});

Note: this doesn't actually strip the whitespace from the field, it only ignores it. So you need to ensure you perform trim on the server-side before inserting in the DB.

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I've found that the majority of these are not quite what is needed.

Using the following only fires on form change rather than on key down allowing you to still check on key stroke for the rest of the validation.

It's not as tidy as including it within the plugin, but it's an acceptable compromise.

$('body').on 'change', 'form input[type=text], form input[type=email]',  ->
    $(@).val $.trim($(@).val())
share|improve this answer

I like the approach by xuser (http://stackoverflow.com/a/10406573/80002), however, I do not like messing with the plugin source code.

So, I suggest doing this instead:

function injectTrim(handler) {
  return function (element, event) {
    if (element.tagName === "TEXTAREA" || (element.tagName === "INPUT" && element.type !== "password")) {
      element.value = $.trim(element.value);
    }
    return handler.call(this, element, event);
  };
}


  $("form").validate({
    onfocusout: injectTrim($.validator.defaults.onfocusout)
  });
share|improve this answer

This is what works for me:

$(':input').change(function() {
    $(this).val($(this).val().trim());
});
share|improve this answer
    
Please explain instead of just posting a block of code. –  eddie_cat Jul 11 at 21:05

Pulled the regex from the jquery validator. Just override their email validation.

$.validator.addMethod("email", function(value, element) {
value = value.trim();
return this.optional(element) || /^((([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_`{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+(\.([a-z]|\d|[!#\$%&'\*\+\-\/=\?\^_`{\|}~]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])+)*)|((\x22)((((\x20|\x09)*(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(([\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x7f]|\x21|[\x23-\x5b]|[\x5d-\x7e]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(\\([\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0d-\x7f]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF]))))*(((\x20|\x09)*(\x0d\x0a))?(\x20|\x09)+)?(\x22)))@((([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|\.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|\d|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))\.)+(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])|(([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])([a-z]|\d|-|\.|_|~|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])*([a-z]|[\u00A0-\uD7FF\uF900-\uFDCF\uFDF0-\uFFEF])))$/i.test(value);
}, "Please enter a valid email.");
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