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So I am learning to make use of Python ctypes module.
Here is simple C file which I compiled with gcc -shared (version 4.8) on Windows to get sample .dll:

#include <stdio.h>
int addition(int a, int b){
    return a+b;
}

I am now able to access it from Python like this:

>>>from ctypes import *
>>>mylibc = CDLL(r"somepath\mysample.dll")
>>>mylibc.addition
<_FuncPtr object at 0x00000000031456C8>
>>>mylibc.addition(2,3)
5

Now I try to do same with different, bigger and more complicated .c file which contains this function:

__declspec(dllexport) void __stdcall
flopequity(HW hero[], HW villain[], double hcounters[],
double vcounters[], double hsums[], double vsums[], ulong board,
__int32 lenh, __int32 lenv)

where HW is typedef for a struct. I compile it with GCC and can access that function as before however when I remove __declspec(dllexport) or _stdcall (or both) the function is no longer accessible.
My question is what could be the reason for me being able to access the simple function from first example but me being unable to access a more complicated function. What are the rules for using calling conventions/
_declspec when compiling C code and accessing it from ctypes ?

share|improve this question
2  
ld defaults to --export-all-symbols unless you use a DEF file or apply __declspec(dllexport) to any symbol in any object file. __stdcall (i.e. WINDLL) appends an @ decoration to exported functions, with the number of bytes in the argument list. You can alias the original name using the linker option -Wl,--add-stdcall-alias. You can get a DEF file with the option -Wl,--output-def,<file>. –  eryksun Aug 16 '13 at 18:44
1  
Microsoft's cl compiler also decorates stdcall (remember this is 32-bit only) with the number of bytes in the argument list and (unlike gcc) prefixes the exported name with an underscore. ctypes looks for this on stdcall function pointers (i.e. not FUNCFLAG_CDECL) -- up to 128 bytes. It won't find names exported gcc style; hence the need for --add-stdcall-alias or a DEF file. –  eryksun Aug 17 '13 at 7:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

gcc seems to export functions by default, you can use any PE viewer like PE Explorer (View > Export) to view the exported functions:

enter image description here

But, If you try to compile this code with VC++, it won't export this function for you, you'll see that there is not exported function:

enter image description here

You need to ask it to export this function:

__declspec(dllexport) int addition(int a, int b){
    return a+b;
}

As for calling conventions, the rule is simple:

If your function uses __stdcall, as most Win32API, you need to import the DLL with WinDLL('mylib.dll') or windll.mylib, example:

> type mylib.c
__declspec(dllexport) int __stdcall addition(int a, int b) {
    return a+b;
}

***********************************************************************

> cl mylib.c /link /dll /out:mylib.dll
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 14.00.50727.762 for 80x86

Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

mylib.c
Microsoft (R) Incremental Linker Version 8.00.50727.762
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

/out:mylib.exe
/dll
/out:mylib.dll
mylib.obj
   Creating library mylib.lib and object mylib.exp

***********************************************************************

> python
>>> from ctypes import *
>>>
>>> WinDLL('mylib.dll').addition(1, 2)
3
>>> windll.mylib.addition(1, 2)
3
>>>

If your function uses __cdecl, witch is the default calling convention, you need to import the DLL with CDLL('mylib.dll') or cdll.mylib', example:

> type mylib.c
// `__cdecl` is not needed, since it's the default calling convention
__declspec(dllexport) int addition(int a, int b){
    return a+b;
}

***********************************************************************

> cl mylib.c /link /dll /out:mylib.dll
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 14.00.50727.762 for 80x86

Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

mylib.c
Microsoft (R) Incremental Linker Version 8.00.50727.762
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

/out:mylib.exe
/dll
/out:mylib.dll
mylib.obj
   Creating library mylib.lib and object mylib.exp

***********************************************************************

> python
>>> from ctypes import *
>>>
>>> CDLL('mylib.dll').addition(1, 2)
3
>>> cdll.mylib.addition(1, 2)
3
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
This is very informative but I still don't get why in first example gcc exports addition function but in 2nd it doesn't export my complicated function. Can it be because there are many other functions in 2nd file ? Or maybe it's because the signature is very long ? –  Piotr Lopusiewicz Aug 17 '13 at 9:19
2  
@PiotrLopusiewicz, The problem is in the way gcc mangles the exported function, it differs across-compilers, you could read more about it here: wyw.dcweb.cn/stdcall.htm. You could work around it by compiling your DLL using gcc -shared mylib.c -o mylib.dll -Wl,--kill-at or gcc -shared mylib.c -o mylib.dll -Wl,--add-stdcall-alias, here an example: codepad.org/4Plp0X05. It works find. –  BSH Aug 17 '13 at 14:33
    
Compiling with those options still doesn't make the function available (dependency walker doesn't see it and loading as in your example doesn't work, it does work for functions with __declspec(dllexport) and __stdcall and it does work for my flopequity function if I add those to the C code and recompile. My understanding from your posts is that it's just a compiler specific behavior and it doesn't make sense to go deeper into it. –  Piotr Lopusiewicz Aug 18 '13 at 10:19
1  
@PiotrLopusiewicz: Using __declspec(dllexport) even once in any linked object file causes the linker ld to disable auto export. You can add a DEF source file that explicitly lists the EXPORTS, or force ld to export all visible symbols using -Wl,--export-all-symbols. –  eryksun Aug 18 '13 at 15:58
    
@eryksun, yeah that seems to be it; I am accepting the whole answer, your comment fixes last piece of the puzzle for me –  Piotr Lopusiewicz Aug 18 '13 at 18:28

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