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I am working on a site using Zend Framework and one of the pages loads much slower on the production server than on the dev one. After some digging and profiling (with xdebug), I found that the PDOStatement->execute call was taking 11 134ms to run on the production server and 780ms on the dev one.

The database is the same on both servers, the MySQL version is the same on both servers (5.5.32) and the MySQL configuration is the same on both servers (down to the lines in my.cnf). Both servers are also running Ubuntu 12.04.2 LTS, although the dev server does have additional software compared to the production one. The only difference I can think of is that the dev server is running on an SSD while the production server is running two regular SATA drives in RAID 0. However running the queries in phpMyAdmin yields about the same time (0.0003-0.0005 sec, although I don't trust phpMyAdmin for execution time reports).


Here are the queries I run:

$query = "SET @rank = 0";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "SET @previous_result = -1";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "
    SELECT
        @group_id := IFNULL(g.id, -1)
    FROM
        `branch_statistics` bs
    JOIN
        branch_to_wave btw ON bs.branch_to_wave_id = btw.id
    JOIN
        branch_to_group btg ON bs.branch_id = btg.branch_id
    JOIN
        `group` g ON btg.group_id = g.id
    WHERE
        btw.wave_id = $wave_id AND bs.branch_id = $branch_id";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS group_members";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE group_members (id INT PRIMARY KEY)";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS group_members2";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE group_members2 (id INT PRIMARY KEY)";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "
    INSERT INTO
        group_members
        SELECT
            btw.id
        FROM
            branch_to_wave btw
        JOIN
            branch_to_group btg ON btw.branch_id = btg.branch_id
        WHERE
            btw.wave_id = $wave_id AND
            btg.group_id = @group_id
        GROUP BY
            btw.id";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "INSERT INTO group_members2 SELECT id FROM group_members";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "
    SELECT @number_of_results :=
        COUNT(result)
    FROM
        (
        SELECT
            ROUND(points / maximum_points, 4) as result
        FROM
            `branch_statistics` bs
        JOIN
            group_members2 gm2 ON gm2.id = bs.branch_to_wave_id
        GROUP BY
            result
        ) results
";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$query = "
    EXPLAIN SELECT
        *,
        @number_of_results as number_of_results
    FROM
        (
            SELECT
                *,
                IF(@previous_result != result, @rank := @rank + 1, @rank) as rank,
                @previous_result := result
            FROM
                (
                SELECT
                    bs.branch_id,
                    ROUND(points / maximum_points, 4) as result,
                    (
                        SELECT
                            AVG(ROUND(points / maximum_points, 4)) as average
                        FROM
                            `branch_statistics` bs
                        JOIN
                            group_members2 gm2 ON gm2.id = bs.branch_to_wave_id
                    ) as average
                FROM
                    `branch_statistics` bs
                JOIN
                    group_members gm ON gm.id = bs.branch_to_wave_id
                GROUP BY
                    bs.branch_id
                ORDER BY
                    result DESC
                ) complete
        ) results
    WHERE branch_id = $branch_id
";
$statement = $db->query($query);

$statement->setFetchMode(Zend_Db::FETCH_NUM);
$results = $statement->fetchAll();

I don't know if the server specs are relevant but here they are in any case:

Production server:

Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU E7500 @ 2.93GHz with 3.4Gb RAM

Dev server (a virtual machine running on the following hardware, alongside 5-6 other VMs):

AMD FX(tm)-8120 Eight-Core Processor with 3Gb RAM


So my question is this: how can I pinpoint what is causing this difference?


Edit #1 (2013-08-16 @ 11:23): for those not familiar with Zend Framework, here is the call stack leading to PDOStatement->execute:

  1. $db->query($query);
  2. Zend_Db_Adapter_Pdo_Abstract->query
  3. Zend_Db_Statement->execute
  4. Zend_Db_Statement_Pdo->execute
  5. PDOStatement->execute

Edit #2 (2013-08-16 @ 13:09): Here the result of profiling on both machines.

Status                              Duration DEV    Duration PROD
starting                            0.000032        0.000010
Waiting for query cache lock        0.000010        0.000006
checking query cache for query      0.000183        0.000074
checking permissions                0.000010        0.000007
checking permissions                0.000009        0.000006
checking permissions                0.000009        0.000006
checking permissions                0.000011        0.000007
Opening tables                      0.000030        0.000017
System lock                         0.000140        0.000063
optimizing                          0.000016        0.000010
statistics                          0.000035        0.000016
preparing                           0.000020        0.000011
Creating tmp table                  0.000028        0.000015
executing                           0.000009        0.000006
Copying to tmp table                0.000424        0.000133
Sorting result                      0.000039        0.000017
Sending data                        0.000015        0.000008
optimizing                          0.000014        0.000009
statistics                          0.000022        0.000012
preparing                           0.000019        0.000010
executing                           0.000011        0.000007
Sending data                        0.000171        0.000110
optimizing                          0.000006        0.000007
statistics                          0.000006        0.000008
preparing                           0.000006        0.000007
executing                           0.000004        0.000006
Sending data                        0.000042        0.000035
removing tmp table                  0.000007        0.000009
Sending data                        0.000006        0.000008
init                                0.000011        0.000013
optimizing                          0.000005        0.000008
statistics                          0.000006        0.000008
preparing                           0.000006        0.000009
executing                           0.000004        0.000006
Sending data                        0.000016        0.000019
end                                 0.000005        0.000007
query end                           0.000005        0.000007
closing tables                      0.000004        0.000006
removing tmp table                  0.000005        0.000007
closing tables                      0.000004        0.000006
removing tmp table                  0.000006        0.000007
closing tables                      0.000006        0.000008
freeing items                       0.000013        0.000275
logging slow query                  0.000004        0.000007
cleaning up                         0.000006        0.000007

I also tested mysqlslap and found some very interesting results, which follow (time is average query time). You can see that while having more simultaneous queries at the same time does increase the average query time, the same query is still 24 times slower on the production server compared to the developement one.

I don't really understand how running the query in phpMyAdmin can take 0.0005 second while the same query using mysqlslap takes 0.299 second but I suspect there lies the heart of my problem.

Mysqlslap settings                      Dev         Prod
iterations = 10, concurrency = 50       1.253       14.129
iterations = 10, concurrency = 25       0.513       7.153
iterations = 10, concurrency = 10       0.141       3.133
iterations = 10, concurrency = 1        0.014       0.299
share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at the execution plans on the prod server for each statement as compared to the dev server? the execution plan in mySQL may show that your missing an index, data in production varies greatly than dev, or that a wrong index is being used causing the delay. but until you narrow it down to the individual statment, it would be tough for anyone here to troubleshoot more. –  xQbert Aug 16 '13 at 15:16
    
Performance drop cant be easily guessed from here but most of the times,you have to look at few key things.Assuming you have same schema in your dev and prod environment,have a look at the data sizes.Use mysqlslap like tools on your dev machine to check the performance under heavy load because dev env is generally not doing as much labour as your prod machine. –  WordsWorth Aug 16 '13 at 15:17
    
Did you try the same query without PDO? –  Your Common Sense Aug 16 '13 at 15:17
    
I see no PDOStatement->execute in the code provided. Looks like a fictional problem. –  Your Common Sense Aug 16 '13 at 15:19
    
@xQbert: the data is exactly the same on both servers. –  Technoh Aug 16 '13 at 15:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I finally figured it out today! The problem was that the temporary tables were not created in memory on the production server. I don't know why since the config files clearly states it should but I solved the problem by adding ENGINE = MEMORY to all CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE calls.

E.g.:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE group_members (id INT PRIMARY KEY) ENGINE = MEMORY
share|improve this answer

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