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Given the class:

public class A<T>
{
    public void Handle(object payload)
    {
        if(IsEnumerable(payload)) //assume this works
        {
            var closedMethod = GetType()
                .GetMethod(
                    "HandleIEnumerable",
                    BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
                .MakeGenericMethod(
                    GetFirstGenericArgument(typeof(T)));
            closedMethod
                .Invoke(
                    this,
                    null); //Exception thrown by the Invoke operation
                           //Debugging shows type as HandleIEnumerable[T]
            return;
        }
        //handle other things
    }

    //This was added because in the above, I can't interact with "T" 
    //  as IEnumerable<U> without using reflection
    //  to jump through the hoops
    private void HandleIEnumerable<U>(object payload)
    {
        foreach (var element in payload as IEnumerable<U>) 
        {
            // do something to element
        }
    }

    private bool IsEnumerable(object payload) 
    {
        var theType = typeof(T);
        return 
            theType.IsGenericType 
            && (theType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IEnumerable<>));
    }

    private Type GetFirstGenericArgument(Type t)
    {
        return t.GetGenericTypeDefinition().GetGenericArguments()[0];
    }
}

An exception is exposed by the test case:

    [TestMethod]
    public void A_Handle_IEnumerable()
    {
        new ClassLibrary1.A<IEnumerable<int>>()
            .Handle(new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4 } as IEnumerable<int>);
    }

Exception details:

System.InvalidOperationException: Late bound operations cannot be performed on types or methods for which ContainsGenericParameters is true.

I am using Visual Studio 2013 preview express desktop on Windows 7.

1: How do I make this approach work?

2: Are generics really the right thing to do here, and if not, suggestions?

*** answer details ****

The correct implementation was to just use the IEnumerable [non-generic] to do this:

public class A<T>
{
    public void Handle(object payload)
    {
        var enumerable = payload as IEnumerable;
        if(enumerable != null)
        {
            //do work on enumerable
        }
    }
}

Ah, the downside of C# as on-the-job training. All the pain points were due to needing a generic version of IEnumerable, which wasn't needed - only thought it was because I didn't know about the non-generic form.

share|improve this question
3  
What are you trying to do with this code? –  alex Aug 16 '13 at 15:46
    
Receive an object of unknown type, if it is an IEnumerable iterate over it and do something, and do something else if it is not an IEnumerable. I tried something much simpler, but everything seemed to need to involve typing IEnumerable<something>, and "something" seems to be only gettable through reflection. –  PatrickV Aug 16 '13 at 16:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. Your GetFirstGenericArgument() is wrong.
    Calling GetGenericTypeDefinition() returns the underlying open generic type.
    Its type argument is T.

    Instead, you should write t.GetGenericArguments()[0], which will get the value of the generic type parameter for the closed type.

  2. No; your code doesn't make any sense.
    What on earth are you trying to do?

    I suspect that you actually want to write

    public class CollectionHandler<T> {
        public void Handle(IEnumerable<T> collection) { 
            // Look ma, no reflection!
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Where and how would that hook in to my code? I gave it a shot but type could not be inferred. –  PatrickV Aug 16 '13 at 16:37
    
@PatrickV: Which that? –  SLaks Aug 16 '13 at 16:43
1  
@PatrickV: After seeing the comment to your question, you actually want to use the non-generic System.Collections.IEnumerable, and get rid of generics entirely. –  SLaks Aug 16 '13 at 16:44
    
Thanks SLaks, that did the trick. Main post updated with details. –  PatrickV Aug 16 '13 at 20:58

Looks like you want to call method HandleIEnumerable<U> when you receive instance of IEnumerable<T> and U inherits from T.

You can do it without reflection, by specifying that U should inherit from T:

  private void HandleIEnumerable<U>(IEnumerable<U> payload) where U :T
  {
    ...
  }

And in your Handle method:

public void Handle(object payload)
{
    if(IsEnumerable(payload)) 
    {
       HandleIEnumerable((IEnumerable<U>)payload);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no constraint on T. If and only if T is an IEnumerable<U>, I want to iterate over that enumerable and do something. But T may be a string as well, in which case I do not want to do that. –  PatrickV Aug 16 '13 at 16:38

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