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I'm implementing a wcf request/response service using Protobuf-net for serialisation and tcp bindings. In running a test with both server and client running on the same machine and am seeing, for around a 1.5Mb response object, a rountrip time of around 500ms.

When I serialise the same object to a memory stream, after recieving the response on the client, it takes around 115ms, and derserialisation, around 330.ms
This kind of adds up with overall round trip time considering the overhead for querying the data from the db etc.

I've seen it written that this is probably at the message size limit that proto buffers should be used for but is this the kind of serialisation/deserisation times I can expect? Does protobuf-net have any size/speed trade off options? Thanks

Here's the model currently...

public class BaseResponse
{
    public bool Success {get;set;}
    public string Error {get;set;}
}

public class SourceTableResponse : BaseResponse
{
   public Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string,string>> FieldValuesByTableName {get;set;}
}
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What does your object model look like? Yes, there are some tricks to minimise bottlenecks - especially around sub-objects (individual or lists) and lists / arrays of primitives. Do you have an example I can attack? –  Marc Gravell Aug 16 '13 at 18:23
    
Thanks Marc, I've updated the question with an example of what the model is like, its still a work in progress. –  gouldos Aug 16 '13 at 19:15
    
What is a List<string,string> ? Also: is that the entire model? i.e. is most of this data tied up in unstructured strings? –  Marc Gravell Aug 16 '13 at 19:20
    
Sorry, it was supposed to be a dictionary. At the moment it is pretty much limited to this. –  gouldos Aug 16 '13 at 19:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are some tricks that can help here, yes. The most common of these is to use "grouped" data as much as possible. To explain: "groups" are a feature of the protobuf specification that google don't use much - they advise defaulting to length-prefix notation for sub-objects - but length-prefix is relatively expensive to write. In most cases, this is as simple as adding DataFormat = DataFormat.Group to a few of the annotations, but : that isn't quite as simple when you have a Dictionary<string,Dictionary<string,string>> - because KeyValuePair<,> is protected by protobuf-net, to prevent it getting broken by well-intentioned users: it doesn't let you change the format. We can still do this, but: we would need to write our own model instead of using naked dictionary - a bit of a pain.

Other tricks:

  • using "packed" encoding on lists of primitives - doesn't apply here; you don't have any
  • making use of interning for heavily repeated string values - looking at your model, I guess the key of the inner dictionary is a field name, so that might be re-used lots of times between tables; we could try interning that one - again, not something we can do when it is Dictionary<string,string>, though

But at a fundamental level: your data is currently going to be dominated by UTF-8 - both in terms of storage and processing. I can't do much about that, since you are storing everything as strings. Personally, I would say that this very loose model isn't really a great fit for making the best use of protobuf-net; all I can do is tighten it as far as it can *within the limits. For example, this works forwards-only (no buffering):

[ProtoContract]
[ProtoInclude(3, typeof(CustomSourceTableResponse), DataFormat = DataFormat.Group)]
public class CustomBaseResponse
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public bool Success { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(2)]
    public string Error { get; set; }
}
[ProtoContract]
public class CustomSourceTableResponse : CustomBaseResponse
{
    [ProtoMember(1, DataFormat = DataFormat.Group)]
    public List<FieldTable> FieldValuesByTableName { get { return fieldValuesByTableName; } }
    private readonly List<FieldTable> fieldValuesByTableName = new List<FieldTable>();
}
[ProtoContract]
public class FieldTable
{
    public FieldTable() { }
    public FieldTable(string tableName)
    {
        TableName = tableName;
    }
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public string TableName { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(2, DataFormat = DataFormat.Group)]
    public List<FieldValue> FieldValues { get { return fieldValues; } }
    private readonly List<FieldValue> fieldValues = new List<FieldValue>();
}
[ProtoContract]
public class FieldValue
{
    public FieldValue() { }
    public FieldValue(string name, string value)
    {
        Name = name;
        Value = value;
    }
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(2)]
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

If you expect lots of repeated values of FieldValue.Name (for example, there are lots of rows, and each row has the same fields), then ... well, frankly I would suggest using a proper type-based model, i.e.

class SomeRow {
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public DateTime DateOfBirth {get;set;}
}

but if that isn't possible, then I suppose you can still avoid having "DateOfBirth" in the data 200 times:

[ProtoMember(1, AsReference=true)]
public string Name { get; set; }
[ProtoMember(2)]
public string Value { get; set; }

But note: this is really really a lot more expensive than using a typed model, for multiple reasons:

  • all that text is expensive
  • names need to be stored (part of the beauty of protobuf is that it avoids storing names at all)
  • all that text is expensive (yes, I already said it - but it really matters)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply Marc, great to get this kind of insight, I'll try out your suggestions on Monday. –  gouldos Aug 17 '13 at 11:58

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