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My JSON string

{
    "account_id": "123456",
    "capabilities": [
        2,
        6,
        15,
        11
    ],
   "currency": "USD"
}

My class definition

public class AdAccount
{
    public long account_id { get; set; }
    public string currency { get; set; }
    public List<int> capabilities { get; set; }
}

Desearialization code:

var account = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Account>(data, new JsonSerializerSettings() { MissingMemberHandling = Newtonsoft.Json.MissingMemberHandling.Ignore });

This all works fine. However what I want is that "capabilities" should be a comma separated string like "2,6,15,11". So I tried

public class AdAccount
{
    public long account_id { get; set; }
    public string currency { get; set; }
    private string _capabilities;
    public string capabilities { get { return _capabilities; } set { _capabilities = String.Join(",", value); } }
}

But this throws an exception

Error reading string. Unexpected token: StartArray. Path 'capabilities', line 1, position 544.

Is it possible to do what I want during deserialization?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
@rjv_mjn did you tried public String capabilities { get; set; }instead of public List<int> capabilities { get; set; } – VeeKayBee Aug 16 '13 at 16:51
2  
Why would you want your in-memory representation to be harder to work with? Surely it would be better to transform the list in your nicer representation (Account) only when you need to. – Jon Skeet Aug 16 '13 at 16:55
    
@JonSkeet My objective in the code I am writing is to get the JSON string and put it in dB where we do a bit of processing with data. The "capabilities" value is not of much importance to us but we would not like the code to throw away any data that we receive. JSON -> Deserialized Obj -> DB. Thanks. – Justin Aug 16 '13 at 18:41
    
@VeeKayBee, tried that. It throws the same exception. Thanks. – Justin Aug 16 '13 at 18:49
1  
@rjv_rnjn: It sounds like your DB-type is specialized for the DB - so I would deserialize to an entity which has the type in its more natural state, then convert to a DB-specific representation. It's easy to go from one representation to another, after all. – Jon Skeet Aug 16 '13 at 19:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I suggest you have two representations:

  • The "natural" representation which has the List<int>
  • The "database" representation which has the joined string

You can easily write converters from one to the other, and it means you don't need to do anything special in the serialization/deserialization paths themselves. The cost is that you end up with two models, of course. I'd recommend making the vast majority of your code use the "natural" representation - only use the DB representation as a stepping stone for when you're dealing with the database.

share|improve this answer
    
I chose this answer as this made me not write custom code for one specific instance and also made more sense (although as mentioned a little bit of redundancy). Thanks. – Justin Aug 19 '13 at 14:36

I would suggest you make an additional property to hold the display value (your CSV). This property would be read-only, and would update/recalculate itself when your list updates.

public class AdAccount
{
    public long account_id { get; set; }
    public string currency { get; set; }
    public List<int> capabilities { get; set; }

    public string capabilitiesDisplay
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Join(", ", capabilities);
        }
    }
}

I am not sure if you need to add an ignore for the Json parser to ignore the property.

The benefit of this approach is that the value is only calculated when you go to access the value.

share|improve this answer
    
The benefit of this approach is that the value is only calculated when you go to access the value. and everytime you access the value. – I4V Aug 16 '13 at 17:48
    
@I4V, yes, it would be calculated on every access. For something trivial, this would be ok. But I can understand for larger systems you might want to look at a lazy loading implementation. – gunr2171 Aug 16 '13 at 18:05
    
@gunr2171 thanks. If all fails I may end up doing a read only property. Since it is accessed only once, the performance shouldn't be that bad. Also, the int array is 5-10 items at the most. – Justin Aug 16 '13 at 18:43

You can create a custom Converter which can do the implicit conversion from List<int> to string

var obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<AdAccount>(json,new MyConverter());

.

public class MyConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(string);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        if (objectType == typeof(string) && reader.TokenType == JsonToken.StartArray)
        {
            List<long> nums = new List<long>();
            reader.Read();
            while (reader.TokenType != JsonToken.EndArray)
            {
                nums.Add((long)reader.Value);
                reader.Read();
            }
            return String.Join(",", nums);
        }
        return existingValue;
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class AdAccount
{
    public long account_id { get; set; }
    public string currency { get; set; }
    public string capabilities { get;set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
He want's it the other way around though (a List<int> to be parsed as a comma-separated string). – Simon Belanger Aug 16 '13 at 17:07
    
@SimonBelanger I updated the answer, it works both ways.... – I4V Aug 16 '13 at 17:09
    
What I mean is the json coming in is a list. Your deserializer take a string instead. :) – Simon Belanger Aug 16 '13 at 17:13
    
@SimonBelanger And I think this is what OP wants :)) – I4V Aug 16 '13 at 17:15
    
@I4V thanks for the code but my JSON will not be what your code expects (as I understand). It is an incoming array of integers which I was trying to convert to a string; and not a string. – Justin Aug 16 '13 at 18:22

Have an additional property which is parsed version of your List<int> Property and set it inside setter of List<int> property.

public class AdAccount
{
    public long account_id { get; set; }
    public string currency { get; set; }
    private List<int> _capabilities;
    public List<int> capabilities
    {
        get { return _capabilities; }
        set { _capabilities = value; this.ParsedCapabilities = string.Join(",", value); }
    }
    public string ParsedCapabilities { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

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