Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Check this code out

    Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() 
        {
            try
            {
                System.out.println("STARTING SERVER...");
                ServerSocket s = new ServerSocket(2544);
                System.out.println("SERVER BLOCKED ON ACCEPT");
                Socket ss = s.accept();
                System.out.println("SERVER NOT BLOCKED ANYMORE");
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    });
    t1.start();



    Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() 
        {
            try
            {
                while(true)
                {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                    System.out.println("Hello");
                }
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    });
    t2.start();

Outputs:

STARTING SERVER...
SERVER BLOCKED ON ACCEPT
Hello
Hello
Hello
Hello
Hello
Hello
Hello
...

Java threads should be user space threads, right? So one blocked thread should block the entire process...thats not what happened. What is happening them?

share|improve this question
2  
What's the point of multithreading if one blocked thread blocks the entire process? –  Matt Ball Aug 16 '13 at 16:54
    
User space threads consume less resources since they do not have to lod program counter, stack, etc... of the kernel thread –  fredcrs Aug 16 '13 at 16:57
    
@fredcrs yes, but they don't actually work at all well. –  Martin James Aug 16 '13 at 17:16
    
maybe they can be usefull when both theads are 100% CPU bound. So kernel would not spend time switching context –  fredcrs Aug 16 '13 at 17:20
    
Context-switching overhead only becomes noticeable under rare circumstances - more ready threads than cores and those threads use so much data that much of the L1 cache needs to be flushed. Not all them many apps like that. –  Martin James Aug 16 '13 at 17:54
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Java threads are "user" threads, but under the hood, the Java Virtual Machine is using kernel threads and delegating the user threads CPU time on each kernel thread in its kernel thread pool. See this question for a better explanation. It seems that threading is JVM-vendor specific, and my understanding might not hold for all JVM implementations.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Most JVMs implement threads with native, OS level threads, including the Oracle reference implementation based on OpenJDK.

I imagine the JVMs that use 'green threads' (user space simulation of threads) would use preemptive scheduling so that an infinite loop in one thread doesn't block the other threads, but without knowledge of a particular implementation this is just speculation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.