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I have a button click event in class1test where I want to set the value of d_testNumber to 3. Then in class 2test I want to be able to do an if test and if d_testNumber show a message box. My problem is that d_testNumber is always 0 in class 2test. Can someone tell me how to get the value from class 1test d_testNumber to class 2test?

This is in class 1test:

public int d_testNumber = 0;

Method in class 1test :

void miEditCopay_Click(object sender, Telerik.Windows.RadRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    d_testNumber = 3;
}

This is in class 2test:

public int d_testNumber;

Method in class 2test:

public void HelloMessage();

if (d_testNumber == 3)
{
      messagebox.show('test worked');
}
share|improve this question
6  
You should read a basic c# book, it would help you a lot before you can start writing code. – King King Aug 16 '13 at 17:30
1  
i am reading one now just trying to do a simple app – user2292217 Aug 16 '13 at 17:31
4  
Why downvotes for a newbie? he shown his work right? why not put him in a right direction? – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 16 '13 at 17:32
    
I'll suggest you to continue reading the book or tutorial, definitely material will guide you to do so. C# tutorials – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 16 '13 at 17:36
2  
A lot of the code you wrote above wouldn't compile... for instance, MessageBox.Show is in all lower, the string you pass to it is enclosed in single quotes, etc. It's best if, in the future, you copy the exact code you are trying in your compiler. If, by any chance, this is the code you wrote in the compiler, you need to review it. – Bruno Brant Aug 16 '13 at 17:36

If it's a public instance property on the class, like this:

public Class Alpha
{
  public int DTestNumber ;
}

Then the other class needs a reference to the appropriate instance of the other class in order to examine it. How that reference is obtained is up to you and the design of your program. Here's an example:

public class Bravo
{
  public void SomeMethod()
  {
    Alpha instance = GetAnInstanceOfAlpha() ; // might be passed as a parameter
    if ( instance.DTestNumber == 3 )
    {
      messagebox.Show('test worked') ;
    }
    return ;
  }

If it's a public static property on the class, like this:

public Class Alpha
{
  public static int DTestNumber ;
}

Then in the other class you can do something like this:

public class Bravo
{
  public void SomeMethod()
  {
    if ( Alpha.DTestNumber == 3 )
    {
      messagebox.Show('test worked') ;
    }
    return ;
  }

Note that static members are singletons with respect to the application domain and the class (Note: statics are per-class properties, not per-intance). Further, if your application is multi-threaded (like a windows program almost certainly is), any changes made to static members are a guaranteed race condition unless you take pains to serialize access via the many synchronization primitives available to you (e.g., the lock statement).

Head First Labs produces some excellent books for self-learning. If you're new to programming, cruise over to Head First Labs and get their Head First Programming: A learner's guide to programming using the Python language (and yes, it does use Python, but for most languages, the skill of programming is not related to the language used.

If you already know something about programming, but are new to C#, then get get a copy of, Head First C#: A Learner's Guide to Real-World Programming with C#, XAML, and .NET. Highly recommended.

Head First Programming

Head First C#

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with your answer completely but surely OP is not going to understand what you meant. He/she looks extremely beginner. IMHO better to guide him/her to continue the tutorials rather than pushing something beyond his/her knowledge. – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 16 '13 at 17:45
    
+1, Now this answer looks comprehensive. – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 16 '13 at 18:02

if you want to use the same value as defined in class 1 then you have 3 options

  1. Make the variable static in first
  2. if you don't want to make it static you need to pass the value to the other class

Example of 1:

public static int d_testNumber = 0;
if (Class1test.d_testNumber == 3)
{
      //your code
}
share|improve this answer

Use static in declaration.

    public static int d_testNumber = 0;
share|improve this answer

You would have to specify further. You have a d_testnumber field in both classes, and the 2test class will use the variable of its own.

If you have an 2test object called 2testObject somewhere, you can do:

void miEditCopay_Click(object sender, Telerik.Windows.RadRoutedEventArgs e)
{
    2testObject.d_testNumber = 3;
}

And pass 2testObject to the HelloMessage() method

share|improve this answer

Maybe you want d_testNumber to be static so both classes can easily access it?

in 1test:

public static int d_testNumber;
//rest of code the same

in 2test:

if (1test.d_testNumber == 3)
{
    //code
}

(Assuming both classes are in the same project / namespace, if not you may need a reference / using statement at the top)

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