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I am coming from JavaScript, in which callbacks are pretty easy. I am trying to implement them into JAVA, without success.

I have a Parent class:

import java.net.Socket;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class Server {
    ExecutorService workers = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
    private ServerConnections serverConnectionHandler;

    public Server(int _address) {
        System.out.println("Starting Server...");
        serverConnectionHandler = new ServerConnections(_address);

        serverConnectionHandler.newConnection = function(Socket _socket) {
            System.out.println("A function of my child class was called.");
        };

        workers.execute(serverConnectionHandler);

        System.out.println("Do something else...");
    }
}

Then I have a child class, that is called from the parent:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

public class ServerConnections implements Runnable {
    private int serverPort;
    private ServerSocket mainSocket;

    public ServerConnections(int _serverPort) {
        serverPort = _serverPort;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Starting Server Thread...");

        try {
            mainSocket = new ServerSocket(serverPort);

            while (true) {
                newConnection(mainSocket.accept());
            }
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Server.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }

    public void newConnection(Socket _socket) {

    }
}

What is the right way of implementing the

serverConnectionHandler.newConnection = function(Socket _socket) {
    System.out.println("A function of my child class was called.");
};

part, in the Parent class, which is clearly not correct?

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marked as duplicate by RAS, RGraham, Tala, Dirk, Michael Härtl Aug 17 '13 at 9:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
The command pattern. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Aug 16 '13 at 17:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Define an interface, and implement it in the class that will receive the callback.

Have attention to the multi-threading in your case.

Code example from http://cleancodedevelopment-qualityseal.blogspot.com.br/2012/10/understanding-callbacks-with-java.html

interface CallBack {
    void methodToCallBack();
}

class CallBackImpl implements CallBack {
    public void methodToCallBack() {
        System.out.println("I've been called back");
    }
}

class Caller {

    public void register(CallBack callback) {
        callback.methodToCallBack();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Caller caller = new Caller();
        CallBack callBack = new CallBackImpl();
        caller.register(callBack);
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

Use the observer pattern. It works like this:

interface MyListener{
    void somethingHappened();
}

public class MyForm implements MyListener{
    public MyForm(){
        myClass = new MyClass();
        myClass.addListener(this);
    }
    public void somethingHappened(){
       System.out.println("Called me!");
    }
}
public void MyClass{
    List<MyListener> listeners;
    public void addListener(MyListener listener) {
        listeners.add(listener);
    }
    void notifySomethingHappened(){
        for(MyListener listener : listeners){
            listener.somethingHappened();
        }
    }
}

You create an interface which has one or more methods to be called when some event happens. Then, any class which needs to be notified when events occur implements this interface.

This allows you great flexibility as the producer is only aware of the interface. This allows your producer to not be dependent on any specific type.

In my example:

MyClass is the producer here as its notifying a list of listeners.

MyListener is the interface.

MyForm is interested in when somethingHappened, so it is implementing MyListener and registering itself with MyClass.

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IMO, you should have a look at the Observer Pattern, and this is how most of the listeners work

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I don't know if this is what you are looking for, but you can achieve this by passing a callback to the child class.

first define a generic callback:

public interface ITypedCallback<T> {
    void execute(T type);
}

create a new ITypedCallback instance on ServerConnections instantiation:

public Server(int _address) {
    serverConnectionHandler = new ServerConnections(new ITypedCallback<Socket>() {
        @Override
        public void execute(Socket socket) {
            // do something with your socket here
        }
    });
}

call the execute methode on the callback object.

public class ServerConnections implements Runnable {

    private ITypedCallback<Socket> callback;

    public ServerConnections(ITypedCallback<Socket> _callback) {
        callback = _callback;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {   
        try {
            mainSocket = new ServerSocket(serverPort);
            while (true) {
                callback.execute(mainSocket.accept());
            }
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Server.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
    }
}

btw: I didn't check if it's 100% correct, directly coded it here.

share|improve this answer
    
How's that if it can implement the default semantic with methods of the interface declared so the code will be more readable, and easy to maintain? –  Diego C Nascimento Aug 16 '13 at 18:57
    
sorry, but I don't get your question. do you mean, declaring an callback implementation instead of directly instantiating the callback interface? –  3x14159265 Aug 16 '13 at 19:08
    
Yes, anyway, its a matter of opinion. –  Diego C Nascimento Aug 16 '13 at 20:24

In this particular case, the following should work:

serverConnectionHandler = new ServerConnections(_address) {
    public void newConnection(Socket _socket) {
        System.out.println("A function of my child class was called.");
    }
};

It's an anonymous subclass.

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